Homegrown Music: Discovering Bluegrass

By Stephanie P. Ledgin | Go to book overview

Selected Works Consulted

I am indebted to all my colleagues and predecessors who have studied in depth and written comprehensively about bluegrass, folk, and country, and whose work I have learned from and leaned on. In addition to virtually all of the reference items noted in “Where to from Here” and “Twenty-Five Recordings to Jump Start Your Collection, ” I have relied on hundreds of Internet sites, scores of liner notes, dozens of back issues of relevant music publications, many personal interviews, and numerous mainstream media clippings. Finally, the following sources were among countless others that were devoured and scoured for background, facts, and interesting tidbits. Many were fascinating; all were insightful. Whenever possible, biographical facts were checked directly with an artist, either relying on his or her personal Internet site or from interviews I have conducted over the years and through the present. 1

Books:American Roots Music, edited by Robert Santelli, Holly George-Warren, Jim Brown (Harry N. Abrams, 2002); The Bill Monroe Reader, edited by Tom Ewing (University of Illinois Press, 2000); Country Music, U.S.A. by Bill C. Malone (University of Texas Press, 2002); Country Roots: The Origins of Country Music by Douglas B. Green (Hawthorn Books, 1976); Finding Her Voice: The Illustrated History of Women in Country Music by Mary A. Bufwack and Robert K. Oermann (Henry Holt and Company, 1993); Folk Festivals: A Handbook for Organization and Management by Joe Wilson and Lee Udall (University of Tennessee Press, 1982); Introducing American Folk Music by Kip Lornell (Brown and Benchmark, 1993); Southern Music, American Music by Bill C. Malone (University Press of Kentucky, 1979); Transforming Tradition: Folk Music Revivals Examined, edited by

1Some books and videos are out of print but may be found in libraries. Others have more recently revised or paperback editions available.

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