In the Adopted Land: Abused Immigrant Women and the Criminal Justice System

By Hoan N. Bui | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A

ABOUT THE STUDY

THE SETTING

My plan to study the experiences of abused immigrant women with criminal justice interventions began after I conducted a pilot study on domestic violence among Vietnamese immigrant families and established contacts with abused Vietnamese immigrant women through my volunteer work with a victim service agency located in a city with a small Vietnamese population. Although no existing official information on characteristics of the Vietnamese immigrant population at the state level was available, I found in the literature on immigration resettlement that socioeconomic conditions and the adaptation of Vietnamese immigrants differed across states, depending on available resettlement programs and funding (Office of Refugee Resettlement, 1993). In addition, criminal justice policies dealing with domestic violence also varied across states and police departments. As these differences would allow an examination of women's diverse experiences within various structural, cultural, and legal contexts, I decided to expand the location of my study to include Vietnamese communities in four different geographical areas in the United States: 1) Orange County, California (the West Coast); 2) Houston, Texas (the South); 3) Boston, Massachusetts (the East Coast); and 4) Lansing, Michigan (the Midwest). The Vietnamese community in Orange County (CA), with the nickname “Little Saigon, ” is the largest Vietnamese community in the United States. It was estimated that one out of every four Vietnamese immigrants to California since the 1975 had settled in Orange County (Martell &M. Tran, 2000a). From 1990 to 1996 almost 45,000 legal immigrants from Vietnam arrived in Orange County, adding to the official count of 71,000 in 1990 (Martell & M. Tran, 2000a). With almost 120,000 Vietnamese residents and more than 2,000 small businesses concentrated

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In the Adopted Land: Abused Immigrant Women and the Criminal Justice System
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Family Lives in Transition 17
  • 3 - Contacts with Criminal Justice Agencies 45
  • 4 - When Victims Become Offenders 71
  • 5 - Women's Safety and Family Life 93
  • Notes 112
  • 6 - Women's Differences and Social Policies 113
  • Appendix A 127
  • Appendix B 137
  • Bibliography 139
  • Index 151
  • About the Author 155
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