Constructing the Stable State: Goals for Intervention and Peacebuilding

By Kathleen Hill Hawk | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4

BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

As Yugoslavia began breaking up in the early 1990s and warfare ensued, the international community found itself torn between fears of being drawn into a seemingly intractable ethnic conflict and the horror that such barbarism could be occurring in late twentieth-century Europe. Beset by their inability to resolve the conflicts among the Somalis, external actors could not reach agreement on what policies should be pursued in the Balkans.

However, as photos reminiscent of the concentration camps during the Holocaust appeared and widespread reports that ethnic cleansing and even genocide were occurring, concerns grew that the conflict could spread through the southeastern region of Europe, and NATO began to take stronger action. Coupled with a Croatian military advance and a willingness of the Yugoslav president to reach an agreement, a political solution that met everyone's minimum needs—yet satisfied no one—was signed in late 1995, allowing the construction of the state of Bosnia 1 to begin.


BACKGROUND OF THE CONFLICT

Slavic peoples first began conducting raids into—and eventually settling in—the Balkan Region in the sixth and seventh centuries. Over the following centuries, the kingdoms of Serbia, Croatia, and Bosnia were formed. Power struggles between the kingdoms soon developed, and Serbia and Croatia split control of Bosnia in the ninth century. During the eleventh and twelfth centuries, Hungary ruled the region. The kingdoms of Bosnia, Serbia, and Croatia regained their independence around 1200. In the late

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Constructing the Stable State: Goals for Intervention and Peacebuilding
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Chapter 1 - The State of the State 1
  • Chapter 2 - Introduction to the Case Studies 25
  • Chapter 3 - Somalia 31
  • Chapter 4 - Bosnia and Herzegovina 59
  • Chapter 5 - Kosovo 83
  • Chapter 6 - Drawing Lessons from Past Experiences 107
  • Chapter 7 - Conclusions and Recommendations 127
  • References 139
  • Index 151
  • About the Author 163
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