India Changes Course: Golden Jubilee to Millennium

By Paul R. Dettman | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Note

Bibliographically speaking, India Changes Course is very much a product of its time. With a time frame that covered developments that occurred in India only a few months before it was written, the sources of the information upon which it is based could not be books produced after extensive periods of research and reflection. The sources would have to be the newspapers and news magazines that reported and analyzed those developments as they were taking place. Given American newspapers' limited and sporadic coverage of Indian affairs and the fact that their reporters and editors viewed these affairs through American eyes, Indian newspapers and news magazines had to be the primary information sources if a picture that was true to India was to emerge. During the pre-computer era, a prospective writer would have had to take up residence in India if he or she were to be able to monitor Indian newspapers and magazines on a continuing basis. With computers and the Internet now available, however, it is possible to be anywhere in the world and glean information on current developments in any other place on the globe.

This is particularly the case if India is the country that one wishes to study. One of India's greatest assets is a free press that includes excellent newspapers and news magazines. Another of its assets is its high level of skill in information technology. These combine to produce a series of web sites, maintained by India's leading English-language newspapers, which provide daily reports and commentary on the important events that are taking place in the country. In addition to

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