Disarming Iraq: Monitoring Power and Resistance

By Michael V. Deaver | Go to book overview

6

Tactical Interaction and Dynamics

By focusing on the task of generalizing about and organizing the diverse and extensive political behavior of this case into clear sets of rival tactics, the previous chapter accomplished some goals at the price of treating these monitoring tactics as if they were static. Because power relations are interactive and occur across periods of time, these tactics are put into motion in this chapter. The monitoring tactics of the Iraqi government and the United Nations interacted within a context of inequality and prevalence of conflict over cooperation to produce identifiable, repeated patterns of behavior. Three such dynamics emerge from the study that have consequences for the tactics used by each side and for political outcomes. In Chapter 2, the following outcomes were identified as being of interest here: changes to the characteristics of the involved actors (i.e., Iraqi sovereignty, Iraqi capabilities and UN monitoring capabilities) and the diminishing returns that may indicate the exhaustion of the potential to change these characteristics. In the first dynamic, there was a competitive deployment of tactics as both sought to counter the efforts of the other side and to reapply with greater vigor their own set of tactics. Whereas this dynamic was generally observed in all areas of interaction, a second dynamic consisting of a specific pattern of interlocked spirals arose in the context of Iraqi reports to the United Nations. While the government's credibility spiraled downward, the UN sought to increase the effectiveness of its tactics. A third dynamic emerged from the periodic confrontations that occurred over implementation, which I have termed trench warfare. The Iraqi government may be seen as seeking to defend a network of defensive positions: in reaction to UN efforts to achieve deep penetration, the government conceded besieged forward positions in order to defend higher-priority, deeper ones. This dynamic had significant consequences for Iraqi sovereignty and capabilities.

After describing these three dynamics, I consider what their implications were for Iraqi sovereignty, Iraqi military capabilities and UN monitoring capabilities. In sum, they worked to the disadvantage of the Iraqi government while stimulating

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Disarming Iraq: Monitoring Power and Resistance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Analyzing Power Relations 9
  • 3 - Iraq's Military Development 31
  • 4 - The Security Council and Iraq: Structuring Power Relations 47
  • 5 - Monitoring Tactics 77
  • 6 - Tactical Interaction and Dynamics 103
  • 7 - The End and New Beginnings 129
  • Bibliography 141
  • Index 147
  • About the Author 152
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