Disarming Iraq: Monitoring Power and Resistance

By Michael V. Deaver | Go to book overview

7

The End and New Beginnings

TACTICS, DYNAMICS, AND THE STRUGGLE TO DISARM IRAQ

In keeping with the double meaning implicit in its title, this chapter serves as a conclusion to this text and offers some ideas for future research on monitoring power, while it also discusses the collapse of the power relations at the end of 1998 as well as efforts to revive the strong and unequal monitoring relationship with a new disarmament agency. As is appropriate for any text of this type, a summary of its principal themes and theoretical insights is presented; thus the utility of the analytic tools developed in answering the question of how a power relationship operates is pointed out after a brief overview of key aspects of the relationship that prevailed from May 1991 to December 1998. Although I have purposely avoided the ambitious task of answering why questions, such explanations can benefit from the insights derived from answering the how question. A discussion of the collapse of the strong monitoring relations in December 1998 helps to illustrate this bonus of a focus on how power relations operate. The prospects for renewal of the disarmament mission likewise can benefit from attention to monitoring power and the past relationship between the UN and Iraq. This overview of the benefits of this focus on monitoring tactics and dynamics is followed by a look forward to other research that may contribute to demonstrating and strengthening the utility of such an approach.

From May 1991 to December 1998, the United Nations struggled to disarm Iraq of its unconventional weapons programs while the Iraqi government's resistance frustrated UN operations without preventing considerable progress. In the wake of the Second Gulf War, the Security Council, following American leadership, decided to impose numerous obligations upon the Iraqi government in SCR 687. Its disarmament requirements, which were further elaborated in subsequent resolutions, were given great weight and were embedded, making alteration difficult. Implementation of these disarmament obligations in the face of anticipated Iraqi resistance required the establishment of a power relationship over

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Disarming Iraq: Monitoring Power and Resistance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Analyzing Power Relations 9
  • 3 - Iraq's Military Development 31
  • 4 - The Security Council and Iraq: Structuring Power Relations 47
  • 5 - Monitoring Tactics 77
  • 6 - Tactical Interaction and Dynamics 103
  • 7 - The End and New Beginnings 129
  • Bibliography 141
  • Index 147
  • About the Author 152
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