C.L.R. James and Creolization: Circles of Influence

By Nicole King | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This project began unexpectedly one evening when, at a gathering, Basil Paquet suggested I read a slim text called Mariners, Renegades, and Castaways to help with my study of Moby Dick as I prepared for my oral examinations for a master's degree. While the texts proved quite useful to read together, the smaller one seized my curiosity and launched my investigations into C. L. R. James. Since then, a series of such serendipitous and generous suggestions from friends and colleagues shaped my dissertation and then this book. I know, therefore, that while all its errors are my own, whatever achievements this book may lay claim to are wholly derived from such contributions and from a variety of collaborations I have been fortunate enough to take part in.

Several organizations provided funding and venues for me to complete and share my work. I especially thank the Mellon Fellowship Program, which funded the dissertation project, the Ford Foundation Post Doctoral Fellowship Program, and the University of Maryland for funding a semester away from teaching. For access to their archives and inclusion in their fellows program, I thank the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. I carried out additional research at the Institute for Commonwealth Studies, University of London, the University of the West Indies, and the Trinidad Oil Workers Union Library, San Fernando, Trinidad.

Of the many people who graciously lived the composition of this book with me I would especially like to thank the following for their contributions of wise council, encouragement, extensive comments, and friendship: my advisors on my original dissertation project, Sandra Pouchet Paquet, Betsy Erkkila, and the

-ix-

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C.L.R. James and Creolization: Circles of Influence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Abbreviations xix
  • C.L.R. James and Creolization 1
  • Mapping Creolization 3
  • Double or Nothing - The Two Black Jacobins 30
  • Framing Community - Minty Alley, La Rue Cases Negres, and Class Consciousness 52
  • Factions and Fictions - Considerations of the “negro Question” 78
  • Family Matters - Nation, Federation, Integration 102
  • Metaphors of Nationalism - Music, Sport, and Racial Representation 118
  • Coda 143
  • Notes 145
  • Works Cited 153
  • Index 165
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