Money for Ireland: Finance, Diplomacy, Politics, and the First Daail Aeireann Loans, 1919-1936

By Francis M. Carroll | Go to book overview

Chapter 1

Dáil Éireann and the Need for Money

A new Ireland emerged from the shattering events in Ireland and Europe between 1914 and 1918. Although home rule for Ireland had been passed by Parliament in 1914, the bill was not to be put into operation until after the Great War, and then with the exclusion of six of the nine counties of Ulster. In 1916 the secret revolutionary nationalist organizations, the Irish Republican Brotherhood in Ireland and the Clan na Gael in the United States, mounted a rebellion, largely in Dublin, during Easter Week. The crushing of the 1916 Rising, the summary execution of its leaders, and the imprisonment of large numbers of people in the aftermath began a process of alienation within the Irish population and stimulated support for a more independent nationalism, which the British attempt to impose conscription in 1918 completed. While W.B. Yeats' expression “changed utterly” may have been an oversimplification, over time it proved true. This change was seen in the dramatic general election results in Great Britain and Ireland in December 1918 when Sinn Féin, founded a decade before by Arthur Griffith and which became the party of the survivors of the 1916 Rising, won 73 of the 103 seats in Ireland. This was a stunning victory. It was stunning because the formerly powerful Irish Parliamentary Party was reduced from 68 seats to six and the Independents and O'Brienites eliminated. Northern constituencies returned 22 Unionists, and two Unionists were elected from Trinity College Dublin. 1

The election marked a major turning point in Irish affairs. The old Irish Parliamentary Party, which had dominated Irish politics since the

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Money for Ireland: Finance, Diplomacy, Politics, and the First Daail Aeireann Loans, 1919-1936
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Chapter 1 - Dáil Éireann and the Need for Money 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Irish Bond-Certificate Drive in America 15
  • Chapter 3 - The Treaty Crisis, the Civil War, and Rival Claims for the Dáil Funds 31
  • Chapter 4 - The Dáil Funds in the New York Courts 49
  • Chapter 5 - New Claims for the Bond-Certificates 69
  • Chapter 6 - The Irish Settlement 83
  • Appendix I 95
  • Appendix II 101
  • Appendix III 109
  • Appendix IV 117
  • Appendix V 147
  • Bibliography 167
  • Index 173
  • About the Author 182
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