Money for Ireland: Finance, Diplomacy, Politics, and the First Daail Aeireann Loans, 1919-1936

By Francis M. Carroll | Go to book overview

Chapter 3

The Treaty Crisis, the Civil War, and Rival Claims for the Dáil Funds

The War of Independence reached its climax in late 1920 and the first half of 1921. If the Irish Volunteers had been unable to drive British forces from Ireland, the British had been unwilling, or unable, to escalate the conflict to a sufficient level to crush the rebellion. Lloyd George and his government had been shocked at General Macready's description of what it would take in military and political terms to wage a successful military campaign in Ireland. By the same token, many in the Dáil and the Volunteers had been appalled at the cost of men killed and captured in the phyrric victory of burning the Custom House in Dublin. 1

Talks between the British cabinet and the Dáil government were possible in June 1921, following a great deal of delicate secret negotiations, and particularly the opportunity presented by the King's speech at the opening of the new Parliament of Northern Ireland. These talks during July and August resulted in more formal negotiations in October and November, leading to the signing of the “Treaty” on 6 December 1921. This Treaty extended to Ireland Dominion status, with complete control of internal affairs, revenue, and defense, but it also required an oath of allegiance to the Crown and the retention of bases by the Royal Navy along parts of the Irish coast. The six counties of Northern Ireland were given the power to reject any political affiliation with the rest of Ireland, although some provisions were made for a united Ireland and a boundary commission was to determine any changes to be made in the six-county border. On the one hand, the Treaty represented a substantial concession by a Conservative and Unionist-dominated coalition cabinet

-31-

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Money for Ireland: Finance, Diplomacy, Politics, and the First Daail Aeireann Loans, 1919-1936
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Chapter 1 - Dáil Éireann and the Need for Money 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Irish Bond-Certificate Drive in America 15
  • Chapter 3 - The Treaty Crisis, the Civil War, and Rival Claims for the Dáil Funds 31
  • Chapter 4 - The Dáil Funds in the New York Courts 49
  • Chapter 5 - New Claims for the Bond-Certificates 69
  • Chapter 6 - The Irish Settlement 83
  • Appendix I 95
  • Appendix II 101
  • Appendix III 109
  • Appendix IV 117
  • Appendix V 147
  • Bibliography 167
  • Index 173
  • About the Author 182
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