Ethnic Identity Groups and U.S. Foreign Policy

By Thomas Ambrosio | Go to book overview

Preface

This book has its origins in a panel at the 2000 American Political Science Association's annual conference in Washington, D.C. While doing the research for my conference paper (which, incidentally, was on a related, but different topic than my contribution to this book, chapter 8), I noticed that there was a dearth of post-Cold War materials on the subject of ethnic identity groups and U.S. foreign policy. Some time after the conference, I contacted members of the panel and suggested the creation of an edited volume. After the panelists concurred, prominent scholars in the field—including Michael Jones-Correa, Yossi Shain, and Paul Watanabe—were contacted and asked to contribute chapters to the volume you are now holding in your hands.

Progress on the book was interrupted by the devastating events of September 11, 2001, when we all saw the United States attacked and two mighty symbols of American ingenuity, risk taking, and power collapse. That day fundamentally changed the lives of countless millions and, yes, the relationship between ethnic identity groups and U.S. foreign policy. Not only was there a new national mission, guiding Washington through the fog of post-Cold War uncertainty, but these events infused American politics with a renewed sense of patriotism and unity. How this will effect the ethnic influence on U.S. foreign policy remains to be seen. But one thing is certain: this volume is as timely now as it was on September 10.

The editorial process was helped tremendously by the contributors, whose patience with frequent updates, queries, and editorial changes was greatly appreciated. Also, Tony Smith provided some helpful suggestions at the beginning stages of the process. Jim Sabin and the staff at Greenwood Publishing Group have made my second book with Praeger a pleasure. Last, but certainly not least,

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