Ethnic Identity Groups and U.S. Foreign Policy

By Thomas Ambrosio | Go to book overview

Chapter 2

Anglo-Saxonism and U.S. Foreign Policy during the Spanish-American War

Paul McCartney

Although the founders of the United States premised its political order explicitly upon principles of liberty and equality, both they and succeeding generations tragically failed to realize in practice the promise of those ideals. Instead, racial constructs positing Anglo-Saxon supremacy and nonwhite primitivism patterned white Americans' thinking so that they could institute a system of chattel slavery within the world's first flourishing democratic republic. The sheer magnitude of that hypocrisy may seem stunning today, but it demonstrates how Americans, like all people, have been willing to distort ideals to make them conform to baser interests.

It is comforting to imagine that interests and values naturally coincide, but that is a facile and dangerous illusion to entertain. A striking example of this capacity for self-delusion came at the turn of the twentieth century, when Americans believed that they had discovered an intellectually satisfying solution to the contradiction between liberal democratic equality and racism when they used social Darwinism as an overarching rubric explaining the nature of social and moral progress. In this chapter, I show how American leaders relied on a conception of American national identity as being both Anglo-Saxon and democratic to formulate the normative basis of U.S. foreign policy before and after the Spanish-American War. American leaders mixed racist assumptions with liberal-democratic values in a way that amazingly led them to define their nation as a paragon of virtuous progress worthy of global leadership. By reviewing the actual policy debates surrounding the war and placing them within their broader cultural context, I show how this paradoxical admixture of civic and racial national identities demonstrably influenced U.S. foreign policy during this crucial episode.

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ethnic Identity Groups and U.S. Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.