Ethnic Identity Groups and U.S. Foreign Policy

By Thomas Ambrosio | Go to book overview

Chapter 5

Serbian-American Mobilization and Lobbying: The Relevance of Jasenovac and Kosovo to Contemporary Grassroots Efforts in the United States

Rachel Paul1

While the importance of pressure groups in the policymaking process in the United States has been studied widely and generally accepted as a given, the role that these groups play in foreign policy development is less well known. However, the explosion of ethnic conflicts abroad, the increasingly “global” economic environment, and calls for U.S. intervention in trouble spots abroad have increased the number of pressure groups focusing on foreign policy and brought new attention to the role that these groups may play in influencing U.S. foreign policy. Noting the relative success of the Israeli, Cuban, and Irish lobbying efforts, ethnic and diasporic groups are now frequent voices in today's pluralist universe, and a new literature is emerging that attempts to explain the proliferation of ethnic lobbying. 2 These groups focus predominantly on policies affecting their countries of origin and must rely on grassroots lobbying techniques to legitimize their causes to members of Congress and the executive branch.

Despite the increased attention to ethnic interest groups, scholars know little about the ways in which these groups form, attract membership, and mobilize to influence U.S. policy. Social scientists have not adequately explained why some groups successfully mobilize their communities to produce powerful ethnic lobbies while other groups remain politically dormant, failing to translate ethnic solidarity into political activism. The post-Cold War conflict in the Balkans gave rise to activism by a number of ethnic groups in the United States and offered a unique opportunity to study how ethnic groups develop and implement strategies to mobilize ethnic Americans in an attempt to sway U.S. policymakers. As global attention turned to the bloody conflict in the former Yugoslavia, Serbs, Croats, Muslims, and Kosovars in the United States strove to have their views heard as successive U.S. administrations debated appropriate responses. This

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ethnic Identity Groups and U.S. Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.