Interstate Cooperation: Compacts and Administrative Agreements

By Joseph F. Zimmerman | Go to book overview

Chapter 2

THE CONSTITUTION AND INTERSTATE GOVERNANCE

The drafters of the U.S. Constitution fully recognized the need for inclusion of provisions establishing a framework for multifaceted interactions between states in the new governance system they were crafting. Experience with the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union revealed certain articles governing state interactions with each other were achieving their goals and these articles were incorporated in the Constitution. The Articles of Confederation, however, did not address two major problems. Interstate disputes over boundary lines, fishing rights, and other issues were left to states to negotiate. Furthermore, Congress under the Articles was not authorized to regulate commerce among the several states and was powerless to strike down state erected mercantilistic barriers to the free flow of commerce between sister states.

The U.S. Constitution incorporates seven interstate principles—full faith and credit, legal equality of each state, privileges and immunities, internal free trade, interstate compacts (see Chapter 3), interstate rendition, and interstate suits. Although the constitution does not specify directly that each state is legally equal, the United States Supreme Court has interpreted the constitution as establishing a federal system composed of states equal to each other in law.


FULL FAITH AND CREDIT

The legislative acts of an independent nation, its court decisions, and its official records have legal standing only within its national boundaries unless other nations recognize the legal documents of a given nation on the basis of comity or reciprocity. The latter, often incorporated in a treaty, is

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Interstate Cooperation: Compacts and Administrative Agreements
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chapter 1 - Interstate Comity 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Constitution and Interstate Governance 19
  • Chapter 3 - The Compacting Process 39
  • Chapter 4 - Compact Commissions 69
  • Chapter 5 - Interstate Compacts Sans Commissions 143
  • Chapter 6 - Formal and Informal Administrative Agreements 163
  • Chapter 7 - Interstate Cooperation: an Assessment 203
  • Notes 219
  • Bibliography 221
  • Index 249
  • About the Author 258
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved in your active project from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 258

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.