Darwin and Archaeology: A Handbook of Key Concepts

By John P. Hart; John Edward Terrell et al. | Go to book overview

The search for cause will continue to be the ultimate goal in science, no less in archaeology than in any other discipline that seeks explanations for the natural world being the way it is. Despite the fact that we often believe we can offer, through experience and common sense, explanations for why and how past humans did the things they did, there is no reason to believe that these explanations should be taken seriously from a scientific point of view. If, as we maintain, objects in the archaeological record are parts of previous phenotypes, then it is reasonable that those phenotypes were acted on by Darwinian evolutionary processes. Reliance on Darwinian evolutionism as a source of causal explanations precludes searching for ultimate cause among the phenomena being studied and places archaeology outside the reach of tautology.


REFERENCES
Alland, A., Jr. (1972). Cultural evolution: The Darwinian model. Social Biology 19: 227-239.
Binford, L. R. (1962). Archaeology as anthropology. American Antiquity 28: 217-225.
Binford, L. R. (1972). Introduction. In L. R. Binford (ed.), An Archeological Perspective. New York: Seminar Press, pp. 1-14.
Boone, J. L., and E. A. Smith. (1998). Is it evolution yet? A critique of evolutionary archaeology. Current Anthropology 39: S141-S173.
Cairns-Smith, G. (1982). Genetic Takeover. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Chambers, R. (1844). Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation. London: Churchill.
Darwin, C. (1859). On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. London: Murray.
Dunnell, R. C. (1978). Style and function: A fundamental dichotomy. American Antiquity 43: 192-202.
Dunnell, R. C. (1980). Evolutionary theory and archaeology. In M. B. Schiffer (ed.), Advances in Archaeological Method and Theory, vol. 3. New York: Academic Press, pp. 35-99.
Flannery, K. V. (1968). Archaeological systems theory and early Mesoamerica. In B. J. Meggers (ed.), Anthropological Archeology in the Americas. Washington, DC: Anthropological Society of Washington, pp. 132-177.
Gould, S. J. (1996). The Mismeasure of Man, rev. ed. New York: Norton.
Kidder, A. V. (1932). The Artifacts of Pecos. Papers of the Southwestern Expedition, Phillips Academy No. 6. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
Leacock, E. B. (1963). Introduction to Part I. In L. H. Morgan, Ancient Society. New York: Meridian, pp. i-xx.
Lyman, R. L., and M. J. O'Brien. (1998). The goals of evolutionary archaeology: History and explanation. Current Anthropology 39: 615-652.
Lyman, R. L., and M. J. O'Brien. (2000). Measuring and explaining change in artifact variation with clade-diversity diagrams. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 19: 39-74.

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Darwin and Archaeology: A Handbook of Key Concepts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Table of Key Words xv
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Adaptation 15
  • References 26
  • Chapter 3 - Biological Constraints 29
  • References 46
  • Chapter 4 - Cause 49
  • References 65
  • Chapter 5 - Classification 69
  • Chapter 6 - Complexity 89
  • Chapter 7 - Culture 107
  • References 123
  • Chapter 8 - Descent 125
  • Chapter 9 - History 143
  • Chapter 10 - Individuals 161
  • References 180
  • Chapter 11 - Learning 183
  • References 198
  • Chapter 12 - Models 201
  • Chapter 13 - Natural Selection 225
  • Chapter 14 - Population 243
  • About the Contributors 257
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 259

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.