An Encyclopedic Dictionary of Conflict and Conflict Resolution, 1945-1996

By John E. Jessup | Go to book overview

E

East African High Commission.
In December 1945, Great Britain announced the formation of the East African High Commission came about as a result of the necessity for closer supervision and collaboration among the British-held African territories after World War II. The commission's role was the establishment of common communications and technical services to be shared by the territories. The organization was based in Nairobi and was made up of the governors of the British East African territories of Kenya, Tanganyika (Tanzania) and Uganda. The governor of Kenya served as the chairman. The group also had oversight of the Royal East African Navy, transportation, postal services and the railroads in the region. A Central Legislative Assembly met to legislate the decisions of the commission. An East African Court of Appeals was established in 1951 and sat in Nairobi. By 1963, all three of the territories had gained their independence, and the need for the commission ended. It was replaced by the East African Common Services Organization (EACSO), which held its charter from the East African Common Services Authority (EACSA), composed of the heads of the three states.

East Berlin.
See Berlin and East Germany.

“Easter Offensive.”
See Vietnam.

East Falkland (Soledad) Island.
See Falklands Islands.

East Germany.
The Democratic Republic of Germany (DDR) came into existence on 7 October 1949, when the Soviet Union, which was occupying that part of conquered Germany, proclaimed the event. On 6 June 1950, East Germany and Poland, both under Soviet domination, signed a treaty establishing the Oder-Neisse Line (qv) as the common border. On the same day that West Germany (qv) received its internal independence (Bonn Agreement, 26 May 1952), East Germany began a Soviet-inspired campaign of pressure through the curtailment of east-west communications. The Soviet Control Commission that held governance in East Germany was abolished on 28 May 1953, and replaced with a Soviet high commissioner. Also, in June 1953, East Germany relaxed its rules against demonstrations. East German workers immediately took to the streets demanding a general strike and shouting antigovernment slogans (16 June). The next day, martial law was declared, and Soviet armored units were sent into East

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An Encyclopedic Dictionary of Conflict and Conflict Resolution, 1945-1996
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Preface xi
  • Some Notes on Using This Work xiii
  • Bibliographical Note xv
  • A 1
  • B 49
  • C 101
  • D 147
  • E 173
  • F 197
  • G 223
  • H 269
  • I 299
  • J 353
  • K 371
  • L 415
  • M 439
  • N 501
  • O 541
  • P 557
  • Q 603
  • R 609
  • S 637
  • T 719
  • U 767
  • V 783
  • W 797
  • X 813
  • Y 815
  • Z 825
  • Index 839
  • About the Author 888
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