An Encyclopedic Dictionary of Conflict and Conflict Resolution, 1945-1996

By John E. Jessup | Go to book overview

S

Saang.
See Cambodia.

Saar Region (Saarland).
See Germany.

Saba District.
See Borneo.

Sabah Province, British North Borneo.
See Borneo.

Sabha, Sinai.
See Egypt and Israel.

Sabra Camp, Lebanon.
On 16 September 1982, a massacre of Palestinians took place in two refugee camps at Sabra and Shatila, near Beirut. At first the Israelis were accused of the atrocity, but it was soon discovered that Lebanese Christian militiamen were actually to blame. In all, over 600 men, women and children were slaughtered in the attacks. In Israel, however, a major scandal erupted over the handling of the entire affair. The two camps, and one at Burj al-Brajneh, were attacked by Shi'ite Amal militia on 20 May 1985. The Amal captured the camps on 31 May.

Sabri (Sabry), Ali.
On 2 May 1971, President Anwar Sadat (qv) dismissed the vice-president, Ali Sabri, from office. Sabri, a leftist and pro-Soviet, opposed Sadat in many of his programs. Sabry and 90 others were put on trial on 25 August before a special tribunal chosen by Sadat. The trial was postponed when defense lawyers claimed the proceedings were unconstitutional (4 September). On 9 December 1971, the trial ended when Sabri and three others were sentenced to death for treason. However, President Sadat commuted the sentences to life imprisonment.

Sa'dah.
See Yemen.

el (as) Sadat, Muhammad Anwar.
(b. 25 December 1918, Mit Abu al Kom, Nile Delta, Egypt—d. 6 October 1981, Cairo) Sadat graduated from the Royal Military Academy in Cairo in 1938. Thereafter, he joined a dissident group of officers in a secret organization dedicated to freeing Egypt of British rule. He was several times arrested and jailed between 1942 and 1948. While in the dissident organization, Sadat became a close associate of Gamal Abdul Nasser (qv). Following the 1952 revolution (see Egypt), Sadat moved through the ranks to become vice president in 1964. After Nasser's death (1970), Sadat was given the presidency by the National Assembly (7 October 1970) and was formally

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An Encyclopedic Dictionary of Conflict and Conflict Resolution, 1945-1996
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Preface xi
  • Some Notes on Using This Work xiii
  • Bibliographical Note xv
  • A 1
  • B 49
  • C 101
  • D 147
  • E 173
  • F 197
  • G 223
  • H 269
  • I 299
  • J 353
  • K 371
  • L 415
  • M 439
  • N 501
  • O 541
  • P 557
  • Q 603
  • R 609
  • S 637
  • T 719
  • U 767
  • V 783
  • W 797
  • X 813
  • Y 815
  • Z 825
  • Index 839
  • About the Author 888
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