An Encyclopedic Dictionary of Conflict and Conflict Resolution, 1945-1996

By John E. Jessup | Go to book overview

U

U Aung San.
On 19 July 1947, the Anti-Fascist People's Freedom League leader, General U Aung San, and a number of members of the newly established provisional government of Burma were assassinated in Rangoon. The assassins were members of the opposition party of U Saw (qv) and were caught, tried and executed (8 May 1948) for their crime. SeeMyanmar/Burma.

Uganda.
The Republic of Uganda (Jamhuri ya Uganda) is a landlocked country of eastern Africa. It is bordered on the north by Sudan, on the east by Kenya, on the southeast by Lake Victoria, on the southwest by Rwanda and Tanzania and on the west by Zaire. The capital city is Kampala. The region was originally inhabited by Bantu tribes. By the eighteenth century, Nilo-Hamitic tribes had made inroads in northern Uganda, them moving southward over the next century. A brisk Arab slave and ivory trade operated there in the early to middle nineteenth century. By 1862, the Buganda kingdom of eastern Uganda was visited by Captains John Hanning Speke and James Augustus Grant—Speke (with Sir Richard Francis Burton) had discovered Lake Victoria and the source of the Nile (1858)—who arrived at the lodge of Mtesa (Mutesa) I, Kabaka (king) of Buganda, on 19 February 1862, near present day Kampala. Mtesa allowed British missionaries to preach in Buganda in 1877. His son, Mwanga, upon his assumption of the throne in 1884 began a persecution of Christians and Arabs with the intent of ridding himself of all of them. The Arabs turned the tide and threw out the Christians and Mwanga, seizing the entire kingdom. This was a short-lived Arab victory, however, as the Christians helped put Mtesa back on the throne. A treaty of German protection of Buganda (1889) was abrogated by the Anglo-German treaty of 1890, which put the Uganda region within the British sphere. The Imperial British East African Company took over administration of the region and signed a treaties of protection with Mwanga and the two western kingdoms of Toro and Ankole, thereby assuming control over all of Uganda. Uganda was declared a British protectorate in 1894. During World War I there was some fighting on the southwestern border, but Uganda was not ever in danger of invasion from German Africa as were other areas. Uganda also survived World War II fundamentally unscathed, although Ugandans served with the British overseas forces. The political realities of the

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An Encyclopedic Dictionary of Conflict and Conflict Resolution, 1945-1996
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Preface xi
  • Some Notes on Using This Work xiii
  • Bibliographical Note xv
  • A 1
  • B 49
  • C 101
  • D 147
  • E 173
  • F 197
  • G 223
  • H 269
  • I 299
  • J 353
  • K 371
  • L 415
  • M 439
  • N 501
  • O 541
  • P 557
  • Q 603
  • R 609
  • S 637
  • T 719
  • U 767
  • V 783
  • W 797
  • X 813
  • Y 815
  • Z 825
  • Index 839
  • About the Author 888
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