Encyclopedia of Tariffs and Trade in U.S. History - Vol. 3

By Cynthia Clark Northrup; Elaine C. Prange Turney | Go to book overview

Tariff of 1857

With Congress dominated by the Democrats, representatives lowered tariff rates across the board. The tax on most items fell by 20 to 25 percent and the new bill placed many items on the free list. Although the passage of this act reflected the position of the party, opponents used this act to blame the Democrats for the economic difficulties that resulted in the Panic of 1857.


Tariff of 1857

“An act reducing the Duty on Imports, and for other Purposes.”

Be it enacted by the Senate and the House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That on and after the first day of July, eighteen hundred and fifty-seven, ad valorem duties shall be imposed, in lieu of those now imposed upon goods, wares, and merchandise imported from abroad into the United States, as follows, viz:

SEC. 1. Upon the articles enumerated in schedules A, and B, of the tariff act of eighteen hundred and forty-six, a duty of thirty per centum, and upon those enumerated in schedules C, D, E, F, G, and H, of said act, the duties of twenty-four per centum, nineteen per centum, and fifteen per centum, twelve per centum, eight per centum, and four per centum, respectively, with such exceptions as are hereinafter made; and all articles so imported as aforesaid and not enumerated in the said schedules, nor in schedule I, shall pay a duty of fifteen per centum.

SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That all manufactures composed wholly of cotton, which are bleached, printed, painted, or dyed, and delaines, shall be transferred to schedule C. Japanned leather or skins of all kinds, shall be transferred to schedule D. Ginger, —green, ripe, dried, preserved or pickled; ochers, and ochrey earths; medicinal roots, leaves, gums and resins in a crude state not otherwise provided for; wares, chemical earthen or pottery of a capacity exceeding ten gallons, shall be transferred to schedule E. Borate of lime and codilla, or tow of hemp or flax, shall be transferred to schedule F. Antimony, crude or regulus of; Barks of all kinds not otherwise provided for; camphor, crude; cantharides; carbonate of soda; Emery, in lump or pulverized; Fruits, green, ripe, or dried; gums, Arabic, Barbary, copal, East India, Jeddo, Senegal, substitute, tragacanth, and all other gums and resins, in a crude state; machinery exclusively designed and expressly imported for the manufacture of flax and linen goods; sponges; tin in plates or sheets, galvanized or ungalvanized; woods, namely, cedar, lignumvite, ebony, box, granadilla, mahogany, rose wood, satin wood, and all cabinet woods, shall be transferred to schedule G. Ac-

-69-

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Encyclopedia of Tariffs and Trade in U.S. History - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Tariff of 1789 1
  • Tariff of 1790 4
  • Tariff of 1792 7
  • Tariff of 1794 12
  • Tariff of 1795 14
  • Tariff of 1796 16
  • Tariff of 1816 18
  • Tariff of 1824 23
  • Tariff of 1828 28
  • Tariff of 1832 33
  • Tariff of 1833 40
  • Tariff of 1841 42
  • Tariff of 1842 45
  • Tariff of 1846 62
  • Tariff of 1857 69
  • Tariff of 1861 72
  • Tariff of 1862 88
  • Tariff of 1864 103
  • Tariff of 1865 118
  • Tariff of 1866 122
  • Tariff of 1867 126
  • Tariff of 1871 129
  • Tariff of 1872 143
  • Tariff of 1883 167
  • Tariff of 1890 199
  • Tariff of 1894 247
  • Tariff of 1897 300
  • Tariff of 1909 353
  • Tariff of 1913 442
  • Tariff of 1922 506
  • Tariff of 1930 579
  • Index 677
  • About the Editors 687
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