Politics, Language, and Culture: A Critical Look at Urban School Reform

By Joseph W. Check | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Lawrence A. Cremin, Popular Education and Its Discontents (New York: Harper and Row, 1990), vii-viii.
2.
Patricia Graham, “Battleships and Schools, ” Daedalus 124, no. 4 (1995): 43.
3.
James Fraser, “Agents of Democracy: Urban Elementary-school Teachers and the Conditions of Teaching, ” in American Teachers: Histories of a Profession at Work, ed. Donald Warren (New York: Macmillan, 1989).
4.
Herbert May and Bruce Metzger, eds., The New Oxford Annotated Bible with the Apocrypha, Revised Standard Version (New York: Oxford, 1977), 4.
5.
L. S. Vygotsky, Mind in Society (Cambridge: Harvard, 1978).
6.
Webster's New World Dictionary of the American Language, 2nd college ed., s. v. “critical.”
7.
Judith Baker, <JudithBakr@aol.com> “High Standards, ” 22 October 1999, <care@yahoogroups.com> (24 October 1999).
8.
National Commission on Excellence in Education, A Nation at Risk: the Imperatives for Educational Reform, (Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 1983).
9.
Popular Education, 39.
10.
David Berliner and Bruce Biddle, The Manufactured Crisis: Myths, Fraud, and the Attack on America's Public Schools (Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1995).
11.
Popular Education, 31.
12.
Larry Cuban, “The Great School Scam, ” Education Week, 15 June 1994.
13.
Gary Anderson, “Toward Authentic Participation: Deconstructing the Discourses of Participatory Reforms in Education, ” American Educational Research Journal 35, no. 4 (1998): 571-603; L. Christensen, “Reconstituting Jefferson, ” Rethinking Schools 13, no. 1 (1998): 1, 8; Richard Elmore, “Getting to Scale with Good Educational Practice, ” Harvard Educational Review 66, no. 1 (1996): 1-26; Richard Elmore and Milbrey McLaughlin, Steady Work: Policy, Practice, and the Reform of American Education (Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 1988); Michael Fullan, “Turning Systemic Thinking on Its Head, ” Phi Delta Kappan 77, no. 6 (1996): 420-23; Michael Fullan and Matthew Miles, “Getting Reform Right: What Works and What Doesn't, ” Phi Delta Kappan 73, no. 10 (1992): 744-52; James Hoffman, “When Bad Things Happen to Good Ideas in Literacy Education: Professional Dilemmas, Personal Decisions, and Political Traps, ” The Reading Teacher 52, no. 2 (1998): 102-11; Edward Miller, “Idealists and Cynics: The Micropolitics of Systemic School Reform, ” The Harvard Education Letter XII, no. 4 (1996): 1-3; Donna Muncey and Patrick McQuillan, “Preliminary Findings from a Five-year Study of the Coalition of Essential Schools, ” Phi Delta Kappan 74, no. 6 (1993): 486-89; David Tyack and William Tobin, “The 'Grammar' of Schooling: Why Has It Been So Hard to Change?” American Educational Research Journal 31, no. 3 (1994): 453-79.
14.
Elmore and McLaughlin.
15.
Walt Haney, “The Myth of the Texas Miracle in Education, ” Education Policy Analysis Archives (electronic journal) 8, no. 41 (2000).
16.
Jonathon Kozol, Savage Inequalities: Children in America's Schools (New York: Crown, 1991).

-35-

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