The Psychologist's Book of Personality Tests: 24 Revealing Tests to Identify and Overcome Your Personal Barriers to a Better Life

By Louis Janda | Go to book overview

Epilogue
Translating Knowledge
into Action

In the Introduction I referred to the 1999 surgeon general's report that concluded that half of all people will experience a psychological disorder at some point in their lives and that a majority of these people will never seek treatment for their problems. While this sounds like a grim statistic, I do believe there is a hopeful explanation.

First, over the years a number of researchers have found that many problems are resolved without professional help. Although I hope you do not use this as justification for inaction, some people experience distress for a few months and either through their own efforts or a change in circumstances, they gradually return to their old selves. An example would be those whose anxiety or depression was caused by a crisis, such as divorce or losing a job. Once the situation is resolved, it may well be that the psychological problem fades away as well. But again, do not suffer patiently, hoping that this will be your experience. Even if you are one of these fortunate people, you can speed the process along considerably by taking an active role in overcoming your barriers.

Second, we have also learned that every community has natural helpers. These people can be found everywhere, and they seem to have a special knack for listening, supporting, and helping their friends and acquaintances. They can be teachers, hairdressers, and yes, even bartenders. Research has shown that for some problems, these natural helpers can be as effective in helping people

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