Encyclopedia of Eastern Europe: From the Congress of Vienna to the Fall of Communism

By Richard Frucht | Go to book overview

N
Načertanije

Secret plan for the unification of Serbia drafted in 1844 by Ilija Garašanin (1812–74), Serbia's minister of interior, for Prince Alexander Karadjordjević (1806–85). After its public disclosure in 1906, it became the subject of conflicting interpretations—was it a Greater Serbia program or Yugoslav? The Načertanije was based on a plan drafted by František Zach (1807–92), a Czech who was a close associate of Adam Czartoryski (1770–1861), a former Russian foreign minister. The plan envisaged the liberation and unification of the South Slavs, who then would help liberate Poland from Austrian and Russian domination. Approximately 90 percent of the material in the Načertanije was incorporated verbatim from Zach's plan. It called for Serbia to complete its “sacred historic” mission, begun by Tsar Dušan (c. 1308–55) in the fourteenth century, of uniting the Serbian nation. The major emphasis was in preparing the inhabitants of Bosnia-Hercegovina, Montenegro, and northern Albania for union with Serbia. Zach, however, had stressed that Serbia would not be successful unless it included the Croats and accepted them as equals, which Garašanin excluded in his program. Hence, those who have denied its Yugoslav orientation have pointed to the systematic exclusion of the term “Yugoslav” found in Zach's plan. For example, when Zach employed “Yugoslav, ” Garašanin wrote “Serbian”; or when Zach asserted that Serbia must “be the nucleus of the future South Slav empire, ” Garašanin substituted “future Serbian empire.” In addition, one entire section on Serbia's relations with the Croats, which stressed that they were “one and the same people, ” who spoke the same language written in two scripts, was deleted. Hence, these scholars assert that the Načertanije was a Greater Serbian program, not a Yugoslav one.

Charles Jelavich


Further reading

Hehn, Paul N. “The Origins of Modern Pan-Serbism: The 1844 Načertanije of Ilija Garašanin, an Analysis and Translation.” East European Quarterly 9, no. 2 (1975): 153–71.

Jelavich, Charles. “Garašanin's Načertanije und das grosserbische Programm.” Südostforschungen 27 (1968): 153–71.

MacKenzie, David. Ilija Garašanin: Balkan Bismarck. Boulder, Colorado, 1985.

See also Adam Czartoryski; Ilija Garašanin; Greater Serbia


Nagodba

Legal arrangement (English, compromise; German, Ausgleich) that regulated the constitutional position of Croatia (officially the Kingdom of Dalmatia, Croatia, and Slavonia) within the Habsburg monarchy, 1867–1918. After the Austro-Hungarian Ausgleich (Compromise) of 1867, which created the Dual Monarchy of Austria-Hungary, delegations from the Hungarian Parliament and the Croatian Sabor negotiated the Nagodba, which was later adopted by both legislatures as Croatian Law 1 of 1868 and Hungarian Law 30 of 1868. Revisions of the agreement, usually minor, took place in 1873, 1880, 1881, 1889, 1891, and 1906. The Nagodba granted Croatia autonomy over internal affairs (primarily policing), justice, and

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Encyclopedia of Eastern Europe: From the Congress of Vienna to the Fall of Communism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Contributors ix
  • Encyclopedia of Eastern Europe xv
  • A - Abakanowicz, Magdalena (1930–) 1
  • B - Babits, Mihaly (1883–1941) 45
  • C - Cankar, Ivan (1876–1918) 117
  • D - Dalmatia 211
  • E - East Prussia 235
  • F - Family 265
  • G - Gafencu, Grigore (1892–1957) 283
  • H - Habsburg Empire 317
  • I - Iancu, Avram (1824–72) 375
  • J - Jagiellonian University 395
  • K - Kádár, János (1912–89) 411
  • L - Labor 441
  • M - Macedonia (Geography) 469
  • N - Načertanije 519
  • O - Obradović, Dositej (Dimitrije) (C. 1739–1811) 543
  • P - Paderewski, Ignacy Jan (1860–1941) 555
  • R - Račić, Josip (1885–1908) 647
  • S - Sabin, Albert Bruce (1906–93) 707
  • T - Taaffe, Count Eduard (1833–95) 785
  • U - Udržal, František (1868–1938) 819
  • V - Varna 825
  • W - Wajda, Andrzej (1926–) 837
  • X - Xenopol, Alexandra D. (1847–1920) 863
  • Y - Yalta Conference 865
  • Z - Zadruga 899
  • Index 909
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