Encyclopedia of Chinese Film

By Yingjin Zhang; Zhiwei Xiao et al. | Go to book overview

S
Sacrificed Youth

(Qingchun ji)

dir./sc.Zhang Nuanxin

with Li Fengxu, Guo Jianguo, Yu Ji, Feng Yuanzheng

Beijing: BFA Youth Film, 1985

Unlike many other films critical of the political repression of the Cultural Revolution,Sacrificed Youth examines this period from a cultural perspective. The film's juxtaposition of Han and ethnic Dai people highlights what has gone 'wrong' with mainstream Han culture.

During the Cultural Revolution, a woman student from Beijing named Li Chun is sent to a Dai village in southwestern China for re-education. Initially she has difficulty fitting in with the local people. But her host family—the granny, the uncle and the big brother—are extremely kind to her and help her in any way they can. Gradually Li adapts herself to the new environment and discovers her femininity after dressing herself like a Dai girl. Meanwhile, her medical knowledge also saves the life of a Dai boy who otherwise would have become a victim of superstition. On a market day, Li meets a young man named Ren Jia from a nearby village who is also from Beijing. The two immediately fall in love. Soon afterwards Li finds out that the big brother from her host family is also in love with her, but she is repelled by his straightforwardness and his somewhat violent manner. After careful consideration, she transfers to another village to avoid the uncomfortable situation. Years later, Li goes to revisits the Dai village before going to college. But the village has been wiped out in a landslide. Her host family and Ren Jia are all gone.


Further reading

E. Yau (1994b), a study of ethnicity and cultural representation; Y. Zhang (1997a), a discussion of ethnicity and nationhood.

(ZX)


Sandwich Man

(Erzi de da wan'ou)

dir.Hou Hsiao-hsien. Tseng Chuang-hsiang, Wan Jen

sc.Wu Nien-chen

with Chen Bocheng, Yang Liyin, Cho Shengli, Jiang Xia, Jing Ding, Chen Qi

Taipei: CMPC, 1983

The omnibus work Sandwich Man consists of three short films. The first, The Son's Big Doll (dir. Hou Hsiao-hsien), concerns a poor man whose job is to masquerade as a clown, walking around town advertising movies for the local theatre. He does this so often that his newborn son comes to recognize him only when wearing his clown suit and make-up: when he shows up one morning in ordinary street clothes his son, having no idea who he is, cries out as his father tries to cuddle him.

The second film, Xiao Qi's Hat, is Tseng Chuang-hsiang's directorial début. A young employee is sent by his company to the countryside to sell a high-tech Japanese cooker. Unlike his partner, who is concerned about the product's sluggish sales, the young man is more interested in finding out about a little local girl named Xiao Qi who always wears a hat. As he gradually wins Xiao Qi's trust, he is ever more curious to take off her hat—when he eventually does so he sees a big patch of burnt skin on the top of her head. He leaves town after his partner is killed demonstrating the cooker.

-295-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Encyclopedia of Chinese Film
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Plates ix
  • Notes on Contributors xi
  • Note to the Reader xiii
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • Abbreviations xvi
  • Classified Contents xvii
  • Part I - Historical Essays 1
  • Chinese Cinema 3
  • Hong Kong Cinema 31
  • Taiwan Cinema 47
  • Further Reading 60
  • Further Reading 62
  • Transnational Cinema: Mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan 63
  • Chinese Film in the West 66
  • Further Reading 69
  • Foreign Films in China 70
  • Part II - Main Entries 73
  • A - Action Film 75
  • Further Reading 85
  • B - Back to Back, Face to Face 89
  • Further Reading 92
  • C - Cageman 105
  • D - Dan Duyu 136
  • E - Early Spring in February 151
  • F - Family 158
  • G - Game of Death 173
  • H - He Jianjun 183
  • I - Iceman Cometh 198
  • J - Jade Love 203
  • Further Reading 204
  • K - Killer, The 206
  • L - Lai, Stan 210
  • Further Reading 213
  • M - Ma-Xu Weibang 235
  • Further Reading 246
  • N - Narrow Street 248
  • O - Old Well 255
  • P - Pai Ching-Jui 262
  • Q - Qin Yi 274
  • R - Rainclouds Over Wushan 276
  • S - Sacrificed Youth 295
  • T - Taipei Story 329
  • U - Under the Bridge 346
  • V - Visitor on Ice Mountain 349
  • W - Wan Jen 351
  • X - Xia Gang 374
  • Y - Yam, Simon 379
  • Z - Zhang Ga, a Boy Soldier 387
  • Bibliography 397
  • Select Internet Web Sites on Chinese Cinema 412
  • Glossary of Chinese Characters 413
  • Index of Titles 450
  • Index of Names 465
  • Index of Studios 473
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 476

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.