Modern Guerrilla Insurgency

By Anthony James Joes | Go to book overview

Introduction

Insurgency and the Future

As this unhappy century draws to a close, two great phenomena dominate the global political landscape. The first is the moral and material bankruptcy of the Marxist-Leninist empire. The second, closely related, is the belief that a clash between major powers along the lines of World War II, or even Korea, is highly improbable.

The proclamations of a new era of world order are reminiscent of the days of the Congress of Vienna or the period immediately after the surrender of Japan. 1 Nevertheless, however unlikely direct great-power confrontations in the foreseeable future may seem to some observers, the world is not heading for universal peace. Far from it. Over large areas of the globe festering problems, including increasing population pressures, persistent inequalities between city and countryside, and—above all—unresolved ethnic and religious resentments and conflicts, have created or aggravated explosive situations. Large areas of Latin America, sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East, China, and the former Soviet empire, all hover on or close to the brink of the abyss.

The nature of the societies afflicted with these problems makes it a certainty that when large-scale violence erupts, it will very often assume the form of a guerrilla insurgency, traditional weapon of the weak but determined. And the very disappearance of the tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union seems to have made it more likely that as volatile areas from the Balkans to the Andes burst into the flames of guerrilla war, one or another major power will be tempted to intervene to protect its perceived interests.

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Modern Guerrilla Insurgency
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - On the Nature of Guerrilla War 5
  • Chapter 2 - A Greek Drama 13
  • Chapter 3 - Insurrections in the Philippines 53
  • Chapter 4 - The Agony of French Indochina 85
  • Chapter 5 - South Viet Nam: Defeat Out of Victory 129
  • Chapter 6 - Afghanistan: the End of the Red Behemoth 161
  • Conclusion 207
  • Selected Bibliography 219
  • Index 231
  • About the Author 235
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