Documents of American Diplomacy: From the American Revolution to the Present

By Michael D. Gambone | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am indebted to the many helpful professionals who populate the archives and historical collections used in this work. I am especially grateful for the assistance provided by the staffs of the National Archives and the Library of Congress. Special thanks goes to Barbara Kegerreis in Kutztown University's Rohrbach Library who provided me with a great deal of assistance in the pursuit of primary source collections. I must also recognize Dr. John Delaney, a friend and colleague, who provided the early stages of this manuscript with an important and necessary degree of focus.

Last, I offer my sincere gratitude to my wife Rachel. Throughout the hectic years that I worked on this project, she was a constant source of encouragement. There is no question that her insight and skepticism served this manuscript extremely well in the early draft stages. Her quick reflexes were also instrumental in keeping my laptop computer out of the clutches of our young toddler Michael.

-xvii-

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Documents of American Diplomacy: From the American Revolution to the Present
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Part One - The Colonial Era 1
  • Part Two - The Early Republic 41
  • Part Three - The Civil War 83
  • Part Four - The Gilded Age 97
  • Part Five - The Early Empire 113
  • Part Six - The First World War 151
  • Part Seven - The Interwar Period 189
  • Part Eight - The Second World War 259
  • Part Nine - The Cold War 287
  • Part Ten - The Post-Cold War Era 447
  • Selected Bibliography 553
  • Index 575
  • About the Author 580
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