Documents of American Diplomacy: From the American Revolution to the Present

By Michael D. Gambone | Go to book overview

Part Six

The First World War

The First World War shattered the conventions that had guided western thought since the Age of Reason. The rationalism that had served the industrial age and produced and fostered a sense of confidence in the utility of science had led a generation. The major powers that were locked in combat in 1914 came to the tragic realization that power could also turn against the hands that wielded it. Sir Edward Grey captured the moment that year when he sadly remarked that “The lamps are going out all over Europe; we shall not see them lit again in our lifetime.” 1

The conduct of this war horrified Americans. The sheer scale of the conflict in Belgium, France, and Russia staggered contemporary observers. The prospect of losing, in one battle, casualties comparable to the entire American Civil War was something beyond the imagination of U.S. leaders and the public at large. 2 More to the point, the havoc it created among the European combatants led many outside observers to openly question whether they or their system of foreign affairs could or should survive the war. The balance of power paradigm embraced by the capitals of Europe had led them from a small flash point in the Balkans to a world war. The stakes involved in forging a new peace were enormous. Postwar diplomacy would not be a simple matter of discovering an alternative to the old European order, but finding a means adequate to ensure human survival from a man-made disaster.

Initially, the United States enveloped itself in neutrality as it sought out an alternative to the way it dealt with international affairs. Part of this decision was a matter of practicality. In 1914, the country had neither the will nor any intention of intervening in the war. Opposition to the war, from leaders as diverse as Samuel L. Gompers, Jane Addams, and Woodrow Wilson, reflected a nation anxious to avoid the bloodbath unfolding on the western front. 3 So the country reverted to a position reminiscent of the America of George Washington and John Adams. For three years, the United States attempted to establish itself as

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Documents of American Diplomacy: From the American Revolution to the Present
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Part One - The Colonial Era 1
  • Part Two - The Early Republic 41
  • Part Three - The Civil War 83
  • Part Four - The Gilded Age 97
  • Part Five - The Early Empire 113
  • Part Six - The First World War 151
  • Part Seven - The Interwar Period 189
  • Part Eight - The Second World War 259
  • Part Nine - The Cold War 287
  • Part Ten - The Post-Cold War Era 447
  • Selected Bibliography 553
  • Index 575
  • About the Author 580
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 580

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.