Absolutism and the Scientific Revolution, 1600-1720: A Biographical Dictionary

By Christopher Baker | Go to book overview

F

FABRICIUS, JOHANN ALBERT (1668-1736).

Johann Albert Fabricius was born in Leipzig in 1668. He attended school in Leipzig and, from 1684, in Quedlinburg. From 1686, he studied theology, philology, and medicine at the university in Leipzig. After finishing his studies in 1688, he traveled to Hamburg in 1693 and there became librarian to Dr. Johann Friedrich Mayer. Under Mayer's mentorship, Fabricius took part in theological debates and traveled to Sweden in 1696. Mayer held appointments as pastor in Hamburg and as professor of theology in Kiel, and Fabricius was granted a doctorate of theology from Kiel in 1699. The same year, he was appointed Professor of Eloquence and Moral Philosophy at the Hamburg Academic Gymnasium. From 1708 to 1711 he was also rector of the Hamburg Johanneum.

Fabricius's works span the disciplines of theology, history, grammar, and classics. His Bibliotheca latina (1697), Bibliotheca latina mediae et infimae aetatis (1734-1736), and Bibliotheca graeca (1705-1707) are biobibliographies, which have made a lasting contribution to classical scholarship; reprints appear in many university libraries. In addition to his own prolific writing, Fabricius edited and translated numerous works on classical and church history, theology, classical literature, and physicotheology.

Until his death in 1736, Fabricius belonged to a series of important intellectual circles in Hamburg. Composed of historians, politicians, clergymen, poets, journalists, and academics, associations like the “Deutsch-übende Gesellschaft” and the “Patriotische Gesellschaft” dedicated themselves to improving society through education and the promotion of the vernacular language and literature. Through his pedagogical initiatives, through his many publications, whether scholarly or popular (his writings for the weekly paper The Patriot, for example), and through his extensive correspondence, Fabricius became an internationally recognized academic. His massive encyclopedic works provide a groundwork for classical research, while his writings on language display a humane and liberal understanding of the organic development of language and dialect.

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Absolutism and the Scientific Revolution, 1600-1720: A Biographical Dictionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Chronology xvii
  • A 1
  • B 12
  • C 46
  • D 84
  • E 103
  • F 109
  • G 125
  • H 155
  • I-J 191
  • K 202
  • L 211
  • M 245
  • N 276
  • O-P 285
  • Q-R 313
  • S 335
  • T 369
  • U-V 382
  • W-Z 395
  • Appendix A 413
  • Appendix B 421
  • Bibliography 429
  • Index 439
  • About the Editor and Contributors 447
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.