Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups

By Stephen E. Atkins | Go to book overview

Chronology of Events

1866

December 24

Founding of the Ku Klux Klan in Pulaski, Tennessee

1884

British Israel leader Edward Hines begins his visit in the United States

1915

Pro-Ku Klux Klan movie Birth of a Nation opens and helps revive the Ku Klux Klan

1920

Final version of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion appears in Germany

1930

Farad Muhammad founds the Nation of Islam in Detroit, Michigan

1931

Elijah Poole joins Nation of Islam and becomes Elijah Muhammad

1933

January 31

William Dudley Pelley forms the Legion of American Silver Shirts

1934

Elijah Muhammad succeeds Farad Muhammad as head of the Nation of Islam

1935

May

Victor Houteff establishes the Branch Davidians at the Mount Carmel compound near Waco, Texas

1937

Wickkliffe Draper founds Pioneer Fund to promote the advancement of the white race

1938

Father Charles Coughlin begins nationwide anti-Semitic radio broadcasts

1942

Federal authorities sentence Elijah Muhammad, head of the Nation of Islam, to prison for anti-draft agitation

Gerald L. K. Smith begins publishing the Cross and the Flag

1949

Francis Parker Yockey publishes his book, Imperium

1950

November

Harry Hay and associates form the gay rights Mattachine Society

1955

Lesbians start the Daughters of Bilitis

September 21

Joel Franklin LeBaron founds the Church of the First Born of the Fullness of Times

1956

Jim Jones establishes the People's Temple in Indianapolis, Indiana

1957

August

Willis Carto founds the Liberty Lobby

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Chronology of Events vii
  • Introduction xxi
  • A 1
  • B 26
  • C 57
  • D 80
  • E 89
  • F 96
  • G 110
  • H 123
  • I 137
  • J 142
  • K 149
  • L 166
  • M 184
  • N 215
  • O 230
  • P 238
  • Q 252
  • R 253
  • S 267
  • T 291
  • U 301
  • V 304
  • W 306
  • Y 326
  • Z 328
  • Selected Bibliography 331
  • Index 339
  • About the Author 375
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 375

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.