Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups

By Stephen E. Atkins | Go to book overview

J

Jasper Murder Case

In a celebrated case of white supremacy run amok, three white men tortured and murdered James Byrd, Jr., in Jasper, Texas. In the early morning of June 7, 1998, Sean Berry, Russell Brewer, and Bill King offered Byrd a lift in their truck. Byrd, who was black, was returning from his sister's bridal shower. The three white men had been drinking before driving around Jasper looking for a party they had been invited to earlier in the evening. They took Byrd outside of town to a clearing along Huff Creek Road and beat him severely. They then chained him by his feet to Berry's truck and dragged him to death during a three-mile ride. They disposed of what was left of Byrd's body at the oldest black cemetery in Jasper, Rosewood Cemetery. A local farmer spotted the body and reported it to the police at around 8:00 A.M. The local sheriff and his men traced the trail of blood back to the Huff Creek Road site. There they found Byrd's wallet, keys, and dentures. At the clearing, the police found evidence that tied Sean Berry to the crime scene.

The Jasper police arrested Berry, and his arrest led to the arrests of Brewer and King. Berry had been in trouble with local police before, but he had never been known as a white supremacist. A local boy, he was popular and had held a variety of jobs in the Jasper area. Brewer and King, however, were both known criminals and white supremacists. They had only recently been released from prison and, while in prison, had been active in both the Confederate Knights of the Ku Klux Klan and the Aryan Brotherhood. Part of the initiation process in the Aryan Brotherhood was killing a black person, and Byrd was the chosen victim.

The news of the murder and the subsequent trials became national events. In a series of sensational trials held in 1999, Brewer and King received the death penalty for their roles in the murder. Berry was sentenced to life imprisonment after he blamed his companions for the crime. He claimed that he had been an unwilling witness. His case will come up for parole in forty years, but his life will be at risk in prison from white inmates because he turned on his friends and from black prisoners because of the nature of the crime. This senseless crime shocked the nation and proved the danger of white supremacy. See also Aryan Brotherhood; Hate Crime; Ku Klux Klan; White Supremacist Movement.

Suggested readings: Anne Barrowclough, “Chained to a Pick-Up Truck, James Byrd was Conscious for the First Two Miles His Body Was Dragged Along This Country Road, ” Times [London] (October 27, 1999), p. 1; Jim Henderson, “When James Byrd Was Dragged to Death

-142-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Chronology of Events vii
  • Introduction xxi
  • A 1
  • B 26
  • C 57
  • D 80
  • E 89
  • F 96
  • G 110
  • H 123
  • I 137
  • J 142
  • K 149
  • L 166
  • M 184
  • N 215
  • O 230
  • P 238
  • Q 252
  • R 253
  • S 267
  • T 291
  • U 301
  • V 304
  • W 306
  • Y 326
  • Z 328
  • Selected Bibliography 331
  • Index 339
  • About the Author 375
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 375

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.