Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups

By Stephen E. Atkins | Go to book overview

W

Waco Siege (See Branch Davidians; Koresh, David)

Walcotte, Louis Eugene (See Farrakhan, Louis)

Warner, James K. (1947?-)

James K. Warner is a leading Christian Identity minister in the South. His birthdate is unavailable, but he was probably born in 1947. He served in the U.S. Air Force before being discharged for neo-Nazi agitation. Warner joined George Lincoln Rockwell's American Nazi Party (ANP) in the summer of 1959. He became dissatisfied with Rockwell's leadership and left in late 1960 after Rockwell had denounced him as dishonest and disloyal. Warner left the ANP with an exposé of the party titled Swastika Smearbund (1961). In 1961 he was ordained as a minister in the Church of God. Next, Warner joined the National State's Rights Party (NSRP), but his stay there was short; NSRP's leaders accused him of trying to steal its mailing list. Warner was convicted of conspiracy to interfere with the integration of schools in Alabama in 1963. Warner became a follower of Wesley Swift and a convert to Christian Identity. After being ordained in the Identity church in 1970, he started his New Christian Crusade Church in Los Angeles, California, in 1971. Tom Metzger was a disciple of Warner, and Warner ordained him as a minister in the church before Metzger broke away from religion. Warner became affiliated with David Duke and was appointed the grand dragon of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan and its director of information in 1975.

In 1976 Warner moved the New Christian Crusade Church to Louisiana. Then in 1977 Warner founded the Christian Defense League (CDL) and became its first director. His church is now located in Metairie, Louisiana, a suburb of New Orleans. Another of his organizations is the Sons of Liberty. Besides his preaching and speaking engagements, Warner publishes a newsletter, Christian Vanguard. In this publication Warner advances the ideas of Christian Identity and attacks racial minorities. In 1978 Warner protested over and attempted to disrupt a CBS television docudrama on the Holocaust. According to Warner, the Holocaust never happened but was an invention of an international Jewish conspiracy. Warner left politics in the 1990s, but his wife Debra Coleman Warner ran for political office in the mid-1990s, losing in 1993 and 1995. See also American Nazi Party; Christian Identity; Duke, David; Holocaust Denial Movement, Metzger, Tom.

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Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Chronology of Events vii
  • Introduction xxi
  • A 1
  • B 26
  • C 57
  • D 80
  • E 89
  • F 96
  • G 110
  • H 123
  • I 137
  • J 142
  • K 149
  • L 166
  • M 184
  • N 215
  • O 230
  • P 238
  • Q 252
  • R 253
  • S 267
  • T 291
  • U 301
  • V 304
  • W 306
  • Y 326
  • Z 328
  • Selected Bibliography 331
  • Index 339
  • About the Author 375
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