Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups

By Stephen E. Atkins | Go to book overview

Z

ZOG (Zionist Occupation Government, Zionist Occupational Government, or Zionist Occupied Government)

ZOG, or Zionist Occupation Government, is a term used in extremist circles in the United States to describe what they claim is the Jewish domination of the U.S. government. In their view, the U.S. government is under control of a cartel of Jewish government and business leaders, who make decisions that are in the best interests of their Jewish compatriots and Israel. These extremists believe that it is the patriotic duty of all loyal Americans to fight against this conspiracy by any means possible. The main outline of the concept of the ZOG first appeared in Colonel John Beaty's Iron Curtain over America (1951). In this book, Beaty identifies the Khazar Jews of Russia with the communists and blames them for the Russian Revolution. William Pierce's novel The Turner Diaries (1978), made the term ZOG popular. The hero in this novel is a leader in the struggle against the Jewish-controlled U.S. government, or the ZOG. Many of the leaders of the militia movement subscribe to the ZOG theory, and they have armed their militia groups to be prepared against any attempts of the federal government to take away their rights. They believe gun control legislation is the first step in a ZOG conspiracy. See also Pierce, William: Turner Diaries, The.

Suggested readings: Jeffrey Kaplan, ed., Encyclopedia of White Power: A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right (Walnut Creek, Calif.: Altamira Press, 2000); Cheri Seymour, Committee of the States: Inside the Radical Right (Mariposa, Calif.: Camden Place Communications, 1991).

Zundel, Ernst Christof Friedrich (1939-)

Ernst Zundel, Canada's leading neo-Nazi and anti-Semitic propagandist, was born on April 24, 1939, in the village of Calmback in the Black Forest region of Germany. His father was a woodcutter by profession and a veteran of the German army during World War II in which he served as a medic. Since he was only six years old when World War II ended, Zundel had little direct contact with the Nazi regime. He grew up in postwar West Germany and worked as a photo retoucher for several years in northwestern Germany before immigrating to Canada in 1958 at the age of nineteen. Soon after settling in Montreal and marrying Jeannick LaRouche, a French-Canadian, Zundel entered Sir George Williams University to study history and political science. About this time, he also became the protégé of Quebec fascist Adrien Arcand. Arcand intro-

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Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Chronology of Events vii
  • Introduction xxi
  • A 1
  • B 26
  • C 57
  • D 80
  • E 89
  • F 96
  • G 110
  • H 123
  • I 137
  • J 142
  • K 149
  • L 166
  • M 184
  • N 215
  • O 230
  • P 238
  • Q 252
  • R 253
  • S 267
  • T 291
  • U 301
  • V 304
  • W 306
  • Y 326
  • Z 328
  • Selected Bibliography 331
  • Index 339
  • About the Author 375
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