Holy Blood: An Inside View of the Afghan War

By Paul Overby | Go to book overview

1

Peshawar

The soul requires intensity. Saul Bellow

IT WAS LIGHT by the time the bus reached Peshawar. February 28, 1988. I hadn't gotten more than three hours real sleep in two days, and the city was dingy. Lining the street were the universal dirty white no-architecture plastered cubes of Mexico and Thailand and Tanzania and everywhere that is poor. The vague area where a sidewalk should be was alive with people, almost all men in shirts down to their knees and baggy pants that matched the shirts in color, like a casual uniform. Some of them, ragged and severe in black beards, looked as if they had just gotten in from the hills.

I had come to see the war in Afghanistan. I knew it would take time to get that far—but Peshawar wouldn't be a waste of time, either. This city in northern Pakistan was the nerve center of the Resistance. The Khyber Pass was only a dozen miles down the road; the offices of the mujahideen rebels were here; there was plenty to learn.

By 1988 the war in Afghanistan between the mujahideen (fighters of the jihad or holy war), or freedom fighters as Ronald Reagan called them, and the Soviets and their Afghan communist clients had been going on for ten years. The fighting had actually started in 1978 with the communist coup, but the real war erupted when the Soviets, after twenty months of growing rebellion, inserted 100,000 troops just after Christmas, 1979. In the classic pattern, the government now controlled the cities and main roads, the guerillas the countryside, except in this case the government instead of the guerillas was communist. The Resistance, as the mujahideen side was also called, was composed of two parts: the commanders inside Afghanistan and the political parties in exile in Peshawar.

I began my search in Peshawar by calling a man whose name I had, Ismail, who was associated somehow with one of the Resistance parties. But carefully…not from the hotel. Slinging my money pouch underneath my shirt,

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Holy Blood: An Inside View of the Afghan War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Peshawar 1
  • 2 - The Root of Stone 12
  • 3 - The Secret Office 18
  • 4 - The American Center 26
  • 5 - Quetta 39
  • 6 - The Failure of Magic 52
  • 7 - Into Kandahar 65
  • 8 - Across the Aghrendab 74
  • 9 - With Mullah Naqeeb 86
  • 10 - The Way Back 100
  • 11 - Between the Graves 114
  • 12 - Resistance Games 128
  • 13 - The Hills of Kunar 142
  • 14 - Slouching Toward Asmar 156
  • 15 - To the Frontline and Back 168
  • 16 - Departing the Triumphant Ruins 178
  • 17 - The Undiscovered Shores 188
  • Epilog 198
  • Notes 205
  • Bibliography 217
  • Periodicals 223
  • Index 225
  • About the Author 231
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 240

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.