Economics of College Sports

By John Fizel; Rodney Fort | Go to book overview

3

The Impact on Higher Education of Corruption in Big-Time College Sports

Paul D. Staudohar and Barry Zepel


INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this paper is to examine the principal findings and recommendations of three major studies. The first is a series of three reports produced from 1991-1993 by the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics. 1 The second is a book published in 2001 called The Game of Life: College Sports and Educational Values. 2 The third study is by the Knight Commission in 2001. 3

These studies lend themselves to analysis and comparison because they examine athletic programs in the context of the mission of higher education. The Game of Life covers a longer time span and views college sports comprehensively and at all levels of competition. The Knight Commission reports focus on the sports of football and basketball at Division I-A schools. The studies are particularly worthy of attention because of the objective approach and high quality of the research. Both of the major Knight Commission studies (hereinafter called Knight I—the 1991-1993 studies—and Knight II—the 2001 study) were chaired by William C. Friday, president emeritus of the University of North Carolina, and Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, president emeritus of the University of Notre Dame. The Game of Life is based on a study by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Author James L. Shulman is the financial and administrative officer, and author William G. Bowen is the president of the Mellon Foundation. Bowen is also a former professor of economics and president of Princeton University.

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economics of College Sports
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 263

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.