Revolutionary States, Leaders, and Foreign Relations: A Comparative Study of China, Cuba, and Iran

By R. K. Ramazani; Houman A. Sadri | Go to book overview

6

CONCLUSION

There is no standard for typical behavior of revolutionary states. The previous chapters indicate that there are clear differences in behavior between China, Cuba, and Iran; yet, there are also significant similarities in their patterns of foreign relations as we shall see.


DIFFERENCES IN FOREIGN POLICY STRATEGIES

The differences among the Chinese, Cuban, and Iranian strategies were primarily the result of their diverse backgrounds and the different sets of regional conditions with which they had to cope. The major differences included factors such as size and national wealth, military capabilities, leadership, institutional means, and the nature of their foreign policies.


Size and National Wealth

Since the size and national wealth of any state contributes considerably to the formulation and implementation of its foreign policy, it is essential to note that the three states were significantly diverse in these respects. In terms of size, Iran ranked between Cuba and China. Its per capita gross national product (GNP) was the highest of the three. Iranian national income, however, had one main source of revenue—oil. Despite Iran's wealth, the quality of life for an average Iranian did not match that of an average Cuban or Chinese. 1 Although China's per capita GNP was far less than that of Cuba or Iran, 2 it surpassed both in size and national wealth. In fact, the People's Republic of China not only had an impressive population and area, but its natural and human resources were unmatched by the other two. Cuba was the smallest of the three in both population and resources. 3 There was,

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Revolutionary States, Leaders, and Foreign Relations: A Comparative Study of China, Cuba, and Iran
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Typology and Terminology of Revolutions 9
  • 2 - Non-Alignment as a Foreign Policy Strategy 17
  • 3 - Chinese Foreign Relations, 1949-1959 35
  • Notes 58
  • 4 - Cuban Foreign Relations, 1959-1969 65
  • 5 - Iranian Foreign Relations, 1979-1989 87
  • 6 - Conclusion 115
  • Selected Bibliography 133
  • Index 141
  • About the Author 149
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