Science Fiction Television: A History

By M. Keith Booker | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2

From Doctor Who to Star Trek: Science Fiction Television Comes of Age

On May 5, 1961, astronaut Alan B. Shepard, Jr., piloted his Mercury space capsule on a modest 302-mile suborbital flight that made him the first American in space, following hard on the heels of the first manned orbital flight, by the Russian Yuri Gagarin on April 12 of that year. By 1969, however, it was the Americans who held the lead in the space race, culminating in Neil Armstrong's small-but-giant step onto the lunar surface in July 1969. In between, American television carried numerous fictional accounts of space exploration. However, given the priority accorded the space race within the cold war context of the 1960s—and given the way the race to the moon ignited the imagination of the general American populace—narratives of space exploration played a surprisingly limited role on American television during the decade. Of course, one could argue that the real-world space race was so compelling that fictional narratives of space exploration simply paled in comparison. Indeed, the televised coverage of the early manned spaceflights represented some of the most compelling television programming to air during the 1960s. Meanwhile, the special-effects technologies (and budgets) of the time remained limited, making the representation of far-out space adventures very difficult. Still, even though television in the 1960s was dominated by Westerns and cold war spy dramas, it is still the case that the programming of the decade provided a pivotal foundation upon which all subsequent science fiction television would be based. In this sense, two series from the 1960s were

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Science Fiction Television: A History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 204

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.