Science Fiction Television: A History

By M. Keith Booker | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4

The Golden Nineties: Science Fiction Television in an Age of Plenty

The success of Star Trek: The Next Generation provided little in the way of an immediate boost to the production of science fiction series on television. Indeed, many programmers still regarded SFTV as a proven loser, with TNG simply serving as the exception that proved the rule. As the 1990s proceeded, the subsequent success of both Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: Voyager did little to change this situation, their membership in the Star Trek franchise making them special cases as well. However, by the time TNG ended in spring 1994, two of the most successful and important non-Star Trek SFTV series ever produced had already begun to air. Indeed, The X-Files, appearing on the Fox broadcast network, drew audiences at its peak that were bigger than any that the Star Trek series had ever drawn. And the critically acclaimed Babylon 5 drew enough viewers to complete its initially projected run as a five-year science fiction epic These series, combined with the ongoing Star Trek franchise and with the growth of the Sci Fi Channel on cable, ultimately made the 1990s perhaps the richest decade in the history of SFTV.

Of course, the 1990s were also perhaps the richest decade in the history of American capitalism, marked by falling government bud-get deficits and an unprecedented stock market boom that ran through most of the decade. With this boom underway and with the cold war now over, one might expect a corresponding boom in science fiction, with its long history of predictions of a golden future. Interestingly enough, however, science fiction in the decade was marked by a

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Science Fiction Television: A History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 204

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.