Science Fiction Television: A History

By M. Keith Booker | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5

Back to the Future: Science Fiction Television in the New Millennium

Programs such as The X-Files, Babylon 5, and Deep Space Nine made the 1990s the richest period thus far in the history of American science fiction television. The situation continued to look bright as SFTV moved into the new millennium. True, Babylon 5 and Deep Space Nine were no longer being broadcast, and The X-Files, beginning its eighth season in fall 2000, was in decline after the departure of David Duchovny at the end of the previous season. Nevertheless, an interesting collection of science fiction programs was still on the air in the year 2000, For one thing, Voyager was still on, representing the Star Trek franchise. Even though Voyager was canceled in 2001, it was replaced that same year by Enterprise, still another entry in the Star Trek sequence. In addition, several promising new programs that had begun broadcasting in the late 1990s were still on the air in 2000, including the alien-invasion series Earth: Final Conflict (which began airing in syndication in 1997, based on an idea by Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry from the 1970s). Stargate SG-1 (which had started in July 1997 on the Showtime cable network and later moved to the Sci Fi Channel) was also on, as were Lexx (a joint German-Canadian production that began as a series of TV movies in December 1997 and survived as a series until 2001 on Sci Fi) and Farscape (an impressive production of the Jim Henson Company that began airing on Sci Fi in March 1999 and continued into spring 2003). Meanwhile, the year 2000 saw the birth of Andromeda in syndication and James Cameron's Dark Angel on Fox, in what had become a rare

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