The Age of Milton: An Encyclopedia of Major 17th-Century British and American Authors

By Alan Hager | Go to book overview

Thomas Carew
(c. 1595-1639)

THOMAS HOWARD CROFTS III


BIOGRAPHY

Thomas Carew (pronounced Carey) was born in Kent about 1595 to Sir Matthew and Alice (née Rivers) Carew. He matriculated at Merton College, Oxford, at the age of thirteen (June 10, 1608), taking a B.A. there in 1611. Around 1613, Sir Matthew lost all of his money in an obscure real estate transaction, and the remainder of his life was spent in trying to recover his fortune and place his sons Thomas and Matthew in lucrative positions. Though Thomas studied law for a while at the Middle Temple, his professional career began in 1612 or 1613 as secretary to Sir Dudley Carleton on the latter's embassies to Venice, Turin, and the Netherlands. Carew remained in Carleton's service until 1616, when he was dismissed for making insulting remarks to or about the ambassador and his wife and for disparaging their horses (the exact circumstances are not known). News of the debacle damaged Carew's prospects for other employment and caused his father to write to Carleton, “I geue him ouer as vtterly lost” (Dunlap xxvii). The epistolary record of the poet's disgrace is ample: especially in the father's letters to Carleton, which reflect both the high publicity that attended the younger Carew's behavior and the increasing dementia of the elder (Dunlap xxiv- xxix). Carew and his father remained unreconciled at Sir Matthew's death on August 2, 1618.

Finding no openings in London, Carew in 1619 accompanied his cousin Lord Herbert of Cherbury to the French court. In Herbert's retinue, Carew struck up a friendship with Sir John Crofts. The connection was to be an important one: Crofts was friends with Jonson,Herrick, and Davenant, and was himself an accomplished poet (he composed the three “Hymnes to God the Father, God the Son, God the Holy Ghost, ” set to music and published by Henry Lawes in 1655). Carew composed the lines “To the King” for Sir John's recitation on James I's visit to Saxham, the Crofts's estate in Suffolk (1619/1620). Carew himself would be a frequent guest at Saxham and compose many verses to its master and his family. While in Paris, Carew honed his

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The Age of Milton: An Encyclopedia of Major 17th-Century British and American Authors
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xiii
  • Timeline of Major 17th-Century British and American Authors xvii
  • (1672-1719) 1
  • (1555-1626) 6
  • (1666-1731) 10
  • (1626-1697) 14
  • (1561-1626) 19
  • Bibliography 23
  • (1640?-1689) 25
  • (1649-1708) 29
  • (1627-1691) 32
  • Bibliography 38
  • (1612-1672) 39
  • Bibliography 41
  • (1605-1682) 42
  • Bibliography 47
  • (1628-1688) 48
  • (1577-1640) 53
  • (1612/1613-1680) 57
  • Bibliography 60
  • (1567-1620) 61
  • Bibliography 64
  • (C. 1595-1639) 65
  • (C. 1585-1639) 68
  • (1623-1673) 71
  • Bibliography 73
  • (1559?-1634) 74
  • (1656-1710) 78
  • Bibliography 80
  • (1613-1658) 81
  • (1653-1713) 85
  • (1618-1667) 89
  • Bibliography 92
  • (C. 1613-1649) 93
  • Bibliography 96
  • (1599-1658) 98
  • (1606-1668) 103
  • (1658-1734) 109
  • Bibliography 111
  • (1572-1631) 112
  • (1563-1631) 118
  • Bibliography 121
  • (1631-1700) 122
  • (1608-1666) 128
  • (1661-1720) 133
  • Bibliography 136
  • (1582-1650) 137
  • (1586-1639?) 139
  • (1563-1639 and 1593-1652/1653) 144
  • Bibliography 146
  • (1554-1628) 147
  • Bibliography 157
  • (1578-1657) 158
  • (1593-1633) 162
  • (1591-1674) 167
  • (1588-1679) 172
  • (1572/1573-1637) 181
  • (1660-1685) 187
  • (1666-1727) 191
  • (C. 1634-1693) 194
  • (1569?-1645) 198
  • (1615-1657) 202
  • Bibliography 205
  • (1632-1704) 206
  • (1618-1657) 216
  • Bibliography 218
  • (1672?-1724) 219
  • Bibliography 222
  • (1621-1678) 223
  • Bibliography 226
  • (1583-1640) 228
  • Bibliography 231
  • (1580-1627) 232
  • (1608-1674) 237
  • (1652-1685) 244
  • (1633-1703) 248
  • (1632-1694) 253
  • Bibliography 258
  • (1659-1695) 260
  • Bibliography 265
  • (1686-1758) 267
  • (1606-1669) 270
  • Bibliography 273
  • (1647-1680) 274
  • (C. 1637-1711) 280
  • (1577-1640) 283
  • (C. 1642-1692) 287
  • (1671-1713) 292
  • (1564-1616) 296
  • (1632-1677) 312
  • (1608/1609-1642) 316
  • (1652-1715) 320
  • Bibliography 323
  • (1578-1653) 324
  • (1575?-1626) 328
  • (1636?-1674) 332
  • (1599-1641) 336
  • Bibliography 339
  • (1621?-1695) 340
  • (1599-1660) 344
  • (1632-1675) 348
  • (1606-1687) 352
  • Bibliography 354
  • (1579?-1633?) 355
  • (1568-1635) 360
  • (1641-1715) 365
  • List of Authors by Birth Year 373
  • Selected General Bibliography 377
  • Index 379
  • About the Editor and Contributors 389
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