Sustainable Mobility: Renewable Energies for Powering Fuel Cell Vehicles

By Raphael Edinger; Sanjay Kaul | Go to book overview

2

THE THEORY OF SUSTAINABILITY

While Agenda 21 was established by the United Nations Conference in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 and elaborated in the Kyoto Protocol of 1997, the fundamental idea of sustainability derived much earlier. The term “sustainability” (German translation Nachhaltigkeit) derived from the concept of economic forestry in the European Middle Ages.


THE ROOTS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Hans Carl von Carlowitz was born in 1645 in Chemnitz, Saxonia/Germany. Carlowitz lived during the time of the Thirty Years' War and was confronted with a growing need for steel production and hence enormous wood consumption in his country. Reforestation could not keep pace with woodcutting, resulting in economic shortages of wood supply and disastrous environmental effects. Forests were cut down rapidly but needed decades for recovery and subsequent economic usability. On various travels, Carlowitz soon became aware that the shortage of wood was a prominent problem all over Europe in the 17th century. Within a few years, more wood was cut than had grown during several centuries.

One year before he died, Carlowitz published the book Sylvicultura Oeconomica (The Economics of Forestry). He outlined the triad principles of sustainability (ecology, economy, and social aspects) and, like the modern ecological economists mentioned in this chapter, subordinated human economic activity to natural restraints. Carlowitz believed that trade and commerce had to serve the society and treat nature in a careful and considerate way. Also, he saw economic activity as responsible for future generations. 1

Carlowitz criticized the short-term mentality of forest owners who converted their properties into farm-land, thus harvesting every year instead of having to wait for decades to grow trees. According to Carlowitz, the profit from cutting

-5-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sustainable Mobility: Renewable Energies for Powering Fuel Cell Vehicles
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Theory of Sustainability 5
  • 3 - Environmental Effects and Public Consequences 17
  • 4 - Energy for Mobility 43
  • 5 - Technology for Sustainable Transportation 79
  • 6 - Mobility for Developing Countries 97
  • 7 - Toward Sustainable Mobility 113
  • Appendix - Units and Conversion Factors 123
  • Bibliography 125
  • Index 131
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 136

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.