The Chinese Triangle of Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong: Comparative Institutional Analyses

By Alvin Y. So; Nan Lin et al. | Go to book overview

9

GUANXI: A CONCEPTUAL ANALYSIS

Nan Lin

Guanxi is undoubtedly one of the most popular terms used to describe social relations among the Chinese people, the functioning of Chinese society, and the operations of Chinese entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship. Writings on the concept make it clear that guanxi carries a much “deeper” meaning and significance than the simple English translations of “relations” or “connections” would indicate. The term signifies deep relations in two senses: it is more than mere relations and connections, and it is a dominant form of exchange among the Chinese.

The purpose of this chapter is fourfold. First, it explores the origin and nature of guanxi in the Chinese context and briefly traces the historical, cultural, and structural paths leading to its practice and dominance in Chinese society. It then explicates the general characteristics of guanxi, so that it can be distiguished from mere “relations.” Third, the chapter places guanxi in the proper context of two forms of exchange, social exchange and economic exchange, and argues that guanxi is not unique to Chinese society. Lastly, it discusses the significance of the socially constructed dominance of an exchange ideology and how it impacts the “worldview” of exchanges. The chapter concludes by arguing why guanxi, like markets, is an important invisible hand in social stability and dynamic changes.


GUANXI IN THE CHINESE CONTEXT

Some scholars argue or imply that guanxi is a unique or particularistic type of relationship among the Chinese (Yang 1982; Hwang 1987; King 1988; Kipnis 1997) or even during or following certain eras (e.g., the Cultural Revolution) in Chinese society (e.g., Chiao 1982; Yang 1994). The Chinesecharacter theory follows from several lines of intellectual analyses, most of

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Chinese Triangle of Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong: Comparative Institutional Analyses
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.