International Terrorism in the Contemporary World

By Marius H. Livingston; Lee Bruce Kress et al. | Go to book overview

MARIE G.WANEK

Symposium Summary

This chapter reorganizes and synthesizes, under a number of key headings, the many ideas on terrorism in general and international terrorism in particular which were developed during a three-day symposium at Glassboro State College in 1976. A wide variety of approaches to the theme of international terrorism was presented—in academic disciplines as well as in opinions regarding the nature of the problem and the degree of its complexity. The content of this chapter reflects primarily the papers included in this book, but some material has been taken from other papers presented at the symposium. *


The Problem of Definition

The fundamental and existential difficulty of coping with the contemporary phenomenon which we so easily in our daily language call “terrorism” was immediately brought into focus: it was impossible to find a universally satisfactory definition of terrorism, and the reasons for this are political rather than semantic.

Violence, and with it terror, goes back beyond the dawn of history: contemporary violence stands on the shoulders of earlier fanatics. Terrorism, however, belongs to our modern, sophisticated technological age. The French Revolution's Reign of Terror and the Revolutionary Catechism of the Russian anarchists Bakunin and Nechaev, Dowling suggested, mark important steps in the development of modern international terrorism: terror as policy and terrorism as philosophy. Wilkinson found the first use of urban guerrilla warfare in the 1848 revolutions. Gros, who analyzed terrorism in literature, found the beginning of intellectual rationalization of violence at least as early as Rousseau and spoke of Sartre's discussion of purifying and creative crime.

Within our own generation modern technology has qualitatively changed the nature of terrorism, for states as well as for dissident groups. Official government terrorism is as old as history—from the Egyptians and the Assyrians and the Incas to the Nazis and the Russians, both Tsarist and Soviet—but modern technology has made genocide possible on a truly vast scale. It has also enabled tiny groups to wield enormous powers of destruction—in contrast to a Guy Fawkes who, O'Ballance noted, in the early seventeenth century had to laboriously transfer his thirty-six barrels of

*Quotations are taken from the papers as delivered at the symposium.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Terrorism in the Contemporary World
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 527

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.