International Terrorism in the Contemporary World

By Marius H. Livingston; Lee Bruce Kress et al. | Go to book overview

ERNEST H.EWNS

American Policy Response to International Terrorism: Problems of Deterrence

There have been several American efforts to deter acts of international terrorism. Among them are the Latin American Diplomats Convention, the United Nations Convention on the Protection of Diplomats and Diplomatic Agents, and the policy of “no negotiations, no ransoms” with terrorist groups. Of particular interest, however, was one specific effort, namely, the 1972 Draft Convention on International Terrorism, which was introduced by the United States in the fall of 1972 in the General Assembly of the United Nations, debated in the Sixth (Legal) Committee, and finally quite effectively killed by that committee.

The 1972 American Draft Convention and the accompanying debates are interesting because they provide an answer as to why it has been so difficult to negotiate a general multilateral accord to deal with the problem of transnational terrorism. There are, to be sure, numerous extradition treaties between states that provide for the extradition or punishment not only of common criminals, but also of certain categories of political offenders, such as individuals who have assassinated or attempted to assassinate a head of state or a member of a head of state's family. (This is the so-called Belgium clause in extradition treaties.) In addition, there are several multilateral conventions in effect that deal with certain specialized forms of international terrorism: the Latin American Diplomats Convention (negotiated in 1971), the United Nations Convention on the Protection of Diplomats and Diplomatic Agents (adopted by the General Assembly in 1973), and the three conventions on aircraft hijacking: the 1963 Tokyo Convention, the 1970 Hague Convention, and the 1971 Montreal Convention. However, the two major efforts to negotiate multilateral conventions against the general problem of international terrorism have both failed. The first was the 1937 League of Nations Conference on the Suppression of Terrorism, which produced a convention for that purpose. The convention never received sufficient ratification to be enacted and so has remained a dead issue. The second was the previously mentioned 1972 American Draft Convention on International Terrorism.

I will concentrate on explaining the 1972 convention's failure to be accepted. The 1937 convention is not without interest, but it was considered in a very different era and by a far more limited number of nations than the 1972

-376-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Terrorism in the Contemporary World
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 527

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.