How Art Becomes History: Essays on Art, Society, and Culture in Post-New Deal America

By Maurice Berger | Go to book overview

not just protect the antiquarian interests of static, albeit valuable, objects. If we are to transcend the immoral and selfish values of the Age of Reagan, we must realize, as The New Criterion and most other cultural journals blindly miss, that the cliché of the pristine, socially removed art object offers no excuse for ignoring even a single life compromised by the interests of culture.


NOTES
1.
Maurice Berger, opening remarks, "The Coming Fin-de-Siècle," panel discussion, the Whitney Museum of American Art, 19 October 1986. The phrase within quotation marks was taken from Carl Schorske, Fin-de-Siècle Vienna: Politics and Culture, New York, Vintage Books, 1981.
2.
Roger Kimball, "Sundays in the Dark at the Whitney," The New Criterion 5, no. 5 ( January 1987), p. 84.
3.
For more on the relationship of these artists to issues of class one should refer to the excellent work of T. J. Clark. See, for example, his Image of the People: Gustave Courbet and the Second French Republic 1848- 1851, Greenwich, New York Graphic Society, 1973, and The Painting of Modern Life: Paris in the Art of Manet and His Followers, New York, Alfred A. Knopf, 1984.
4.
These artists include, among many others, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Group Material, Candace Hill, Dennis Adams, Adrian Piper, Mel Rosenthal, and Martha Rosler. For more on this subject, see Rosalyn Deutsche, "Krzysztof Wodiczko's Homeless Projection and the Site of Urban 'Revitalization,'" October, no. 38 ( Fall 1986), pp. 63-98, and Brian Wallis, ed., If You Lived Here: The City in Art, Theory, and Social Activism/A Project by Martha Rosler, Seattle, Bay Press, 1991.
5.
See, for example, Rosalyn Deutsche and Cara Gendel Ryan, "The Fine Art of Gentrification," October, no. 31 ( Winter 1984), pp. 91-111.
6.
For an important analysis of Greenberg's strategy of negation, see T. J. Clark, "Clement Greenberg's Theory of Art," in Francis Frascina, ed., Pollock and After: The Critical Debate, New York, Harper & Row, 1985, pp. 47-63.
7.
Clement Greenberg, "Avant-Garde and Kitsch," in Frascina, pp. 28- 29.
8.
Foucault continues: "If there is one approach that I do reject, however, it is that (one might call it, broadly speaking, the phenomenological approach) which gives absolute priority to the observing subject, which attributes a constituent role to an act, which places its own point of view at

-xxii-

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How Art Becomes History: Essays on Art, Society, and Culture in Post-New Deal America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction: How Art Becomes History xiii
  • Notes xxii
  • 1 - FSA: The Illiterate Eye 1
  • II - Of Cold Wars and Curators: the Case of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg 23
  • III - World Fairness 46
  • V - Race and Representation 78
  • VI - Black Skin, White Masks: Adrian Piper and the Politics of Viewing 93
  • VII - Culture Stories/American Myths 114
  • VIII - Are Art Museums Racist? 143
  • Notes 166
  • Index 195
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