How Art Becomes History: Essays on Art, Society, and Culture in Post-New Deal America

By Maurice Berger | Go to book overview

whether scholars, artists, or both--can produce work that opposes structures of domination, that presents possibilities for a transformed future by willingly interrogating their own work on aesthetic or political grounds. This interrogation itself becomes an act of critical intervention, fundamentally fostering an attitude of vigilance rather than denial. 38

When it comes to the question of why we ignore the art of African-Americans and other people of color, simply learning how to listen to others is not enough. We must first learn how to listen to ourselves, no matter how painful that process might be.


NOTES
1.
See Marcia Tucker, "Preface," and Laura Trippi, "Fractured Fairy Tales, Chaotic Regimes," in Strange Attractors: Signs of Chaos, New York, New Museum of Contemporary Art, 1989, n.p. Hammons's installation is neither mentioned nor illustrated in the catalogue.
2.
See C. Gerald Fraser, "The Voice of Malcolm X Has an Audience Again," New York Times, Feb. 20, 1990, p. B3.
3.
Judith Wilson, "Art," in Donald Bogle, ed., Black Arts Annual, 1987/ 1988, New York, Garland, 1989, p. 7.
4.
See Howardena Pindell, "Art World Racism: A Documentation," New Art Examiner, vol. 16, no. 7 ( Mar. 1989), pp. 32-36. In addition to a listing of New York galleries with mostly' white stables (and the percentage of artists of color represented by each of these galleries), Pindell supplied a detailed statistical overview of exhibition records for artists of color at the following New York museums: Brooklyn Museum, Guggenheim Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, Queens Museum, Snug Harbor Cultural Center (Staten Island), and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Statistics were also given for selected group exhibitions and publications.
5.
For more on PESTS, see Wilson, "Art," p. 5.
6.
Judith Wilson then continues in "Art" (p. 4): "Thus black artists often find it harder to gain exposure in New York than in other parts of the country, because the economic stakes are generally higher in a town that serves as the hub of the international art market."
7.
For more on the historical resistance of the "white cultural avant-

-166-

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How Art Becomes History: Essays on Art, Society, and Culture in Post-New Deal America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction: How Art Becomes History xiii
  • Notes xxii
  • 1 - FSA: The Illiterate Eye 1
  • II - Of Cold Wars and Curators: the Case of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg 23
  • III - World Fairness 46
  • V - Race and Representation 78
  • VI - Black Skin, White Masks: Adrian Piper and the Politics of Viewing 93
  • VII - Culture Stories/American Myths 114
  • VIII - Are Art Museums Racist? 143
  • Notes 166
  • Index 195
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