Citizens and Statesmen: A Study of Aristotle's Politics

By Mary P. Nichols | Go to book overview

WORKS FREQUENTLY CITED

I. Primary Works

Aristotle. Ethica Nicomachea. Edited by Ingraham Bywater. Scriptorium Classicorum Bibliotheca Oxoniensis. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1894.

Aristotle. Politica. Edited by W. D. Ross. Scriptorium Classicorum Bibliotheca Oxoniensis. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1957.

Aristotle. The Politics. Translated with an introduction, notes, and glossary by Lord Carnes. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1984.

Aristotle. The Politics of Aristotle. Edited, with an introduction, two prefatory essays, and notes critical and explanatory, by W. L. Newman. 4 vols. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1887- 1902. Reprinted in Salem, N.H.: Arno Press, 1985.

Plato. Opera. Edited by John Burnet. 5 vols. Scriptorium Classicorum Bibliotheca Oxoniensis. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1900- 1907.


II. Secondary Works

Ambler, Wayne H. "Aristotle on Acquisition." The Canadian Journal of Political Science 17, no. 3 ( September 1984): 487-502.

—. "Aristotle on Nature and Politics: The Case of Slavery." Political Theory 15, no. 3 ( August 1987): 390-410.

—. " Aristotle's Understanding of the Naturalness of the City." The Review of Politics 47, no. 2 ( April 1985): 163-85.

Barker, Ernest. The Political Thought of Plato and Aristotle. New York: Dover Publications, 1959.

Bluhm, William. "The Place of 'Polity' in Aristotle's Theory of the Ideal State." The Journal of Politics 24, no. 4 ( November 1962): 743-53.

Coby, Patrick. "Aristotle's Three Cities and the Problem of Faction." The Journal of Politics 50, no. 4 ( November 1988): 896-919.

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Citizens and Statesmen: A Study of Aristotle's Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Citizens and Statesmen - A Study of Aristotle's Politics *
  • Contents *
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Origins of the City 13
  • Chapter 2 - Finding a Place for Beast and God 53
  • Chapter 3 - Turning Regimes into Polities 85
  • Chapter 4 - The Best Regime and the Limits of Politics 125
  • Chapter 5 - Citizens, Statesmen, and Modern Political Theory 169
  • Endnotes 177
  • Works Frequently Cited 223
  • Index 227
  • About the Author *
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