The Specter of Genocide: Mass Murder in Historical Perspective

By Robert Gellately; Ben Kieman | Go to book overview

The Specter of Genocide
MASS MURDER IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

Genocide, mass murder, and human rights abuses are arguably the most perplexing and deeply troubling aspects of recent world history. This collection of essays by leading international experts offers an up-to-date, comprehensive history and analysis of multiple cases of genocide and genocidal acts, with a focus on the twentieth century. The book contains studies of the Armenian genocide, the victims of Stalinist terror, the Holocaust, and imperial Japan. Several authors explore colonialism and address the fate of the indigenous peoples in Africa, North America, and Australia. As well, there is extensive coverage of the post-1945 period, including the atrocities inthe former Yugoslavia, Bali, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Rwanda, East Timor, and Guatemala. The book emphasizes the importance of comparative analysis and theoretical discussion, and it raises new questions about the difficult challenges for modernity constituted by genocide and other mass crimes.

Robert Gellately is Strassler Professor inHolocaust History at Clark University. His previous books include Backing Hitler (2001) and The Gestapo and German Society (1990). He coedited, with NathanStoltzfus, Social Outsiders in Nazi Germany (2001) and, with Sheila Fitzpatrick, Accusatory Practices (1997).

Ben Kiernan is A. Whitney Griswold Professor of History and Director of the Genocide Studies Program at Yale University. He is the author of The Pol Pot Regime (1996; 2nd ed., 2002) and How Pol Pot Came to Power (1985) and the editor of Genocide and Democracy in Cambodia (1993).

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