A Culture of Teaching: Early Modern Humanism in Theory and Practice

By Rebecca W. Bushnell | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book belongs partly to David Boyd, who read every word in manuscript, several times over. Because he cares deeply about teaching and scholarship he was an ideal reader, but he is also an inspiring friend. Phyllis Rackin also kept her sharp eye on the text; as always, I am grateful for her friendship and unflagging support. Other good friends and colleagues read or edited parts of this book as it grew, and they nurtured it with a bracing mixture of encouragement and criticism: Gregory Bredbeck, Peter Conn, Alan Filreis, Beverly Haviland, Constance Jordan, Victoria Kahn, Donald Kelley, Roger Mason, Robert Nelsen, Elisa New, Jeffrey Perl, Maureen Quilligan, Barbara Riebling, David Sacks, Julie Solomon, Peter Stallybrass, Max Thomas, Gary Tomlinson, and Robert Turner. The students in my graduate seminars on English humanism and Renaissance languages also helped me germinate many of my ideas. When I started the book, Catherine Michaud was a valuable research assistant; for most of it, the incomparable Suzanne Daly scrolled through endless microfilms, decoded black letter, and lent her intelligence and good humor to the enterprise. The staff at the University of Pennsylvania libraries and, in particular, Daniel Traister and Hilda Pring were understanding and helpful. Georgianna Ziegler of the Folger Shakespeare Library lent her expertise to the task of tracking down the illustrations. William Kennedy and Anthony Grafton served as sympathetic and rigorous readers for Cornel l University Press, and Bernhard Kendler once again proved a stalwart editor. I also thank Raphael Seligmann and Kay Scheuer for their scrupulous and thoughtful editing of the manuscript. The research was

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A Culture of Teaching: Early Modern Humanism in Theory and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Note on Text and Translations xiii
  • Prologue the Trials of Humanism 1
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction: Humanism Reconsidered 10
  • Chapter 2 - The Sovereign Master and the Scholar Prince 23
  • Chapter 3 - Cultivating the Mind 73
  • Chapter 4 - Harvesting Books 117
  • Chapter 5 - Tradition and Sovereignty 144
  • Epilogue Contemporary Humanist Pedagogy 185
  • Index 203
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