Going Public: Women and Publishing in Early Modern France

By Dena Goodman; Elizabeth C. Goldsmith | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Going Public is the result of a collaborative effort among literary scholars and historians. The editors of the volume and several of the contributors met in Cambridge in 1988 and formed a reading group, "Forgotten Women of Early Modern France," under the aegis of Harvard's Center for Literary and Cultural Studies. This project is a product of and a testament to that group, including those drawn to it over the years who have contributed to its discourse and to this book.

As our initial group expanded over time, it has now, through print, expanded yet again, to include still other scholars from both disciplines and across the United States. Through the efforts of one of these scholars, Kathryn Norberg, and the UCLA Center for the Study of Women, which she heads, we were able to bring together all the contributors to this volume in the hospitable surroundings of UCLA's William Andrews Clark Library. Funding for the conference was provided by the Florence Gould Foundation, with additional support from the UCLA Center for Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Studies. We are happy to acknowledge that support. We are also grateful for the insightful and enthusiastic discussion of the papers offered by a dedicated audience recovering at the time from a major earthquake. The articles collected here have all benefited from that discussion.

Finally, we wish to express our thanks to our editor, Bernhard Kendler, whose wisdom, humor, and expertise were indispensable to the completion of this project.

E. C. G.
D. G.

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