Not All Wives: Women of Colonial Philadelphia

By Karin Wulf | Go to book overview

Preface

Although much of the research for this book derives from my 1993 Johns Hopkins dissertation, the idea for the book has earlier origins and owes much to the inspiration of a handful of excellent teachers. I first started thinking about the historical and analytical problem of unmarried women when I was a student at American University in visiting professor Joan Hoff's seminar on women and the Constitution. Women's "status" was still very much occupying historians' attention in the mid‐ 1980s, and it struck me that it was specifically married women's status that was the subject of this scrutiny. Rather than focusing on coverture's effects on married women, I thought that examining those women who by law were not "covered," but who were very likely still restricted by the gendered ideals of submission and dependence associated with wives, would make a good study. I went to Johns Hopkins with a very different dissertation in mind, but I returned to the subject of unmarried women after an invigorating seminar on family and gender history with Toby Ditz. I especially want to thank my advisor, Jack P. Greene, for his willingness to be won over to the topic. I continue to value his model of scholarly energy, rigor, and productivity. I also want to thank my undergraduate mentor, now my colleague and friend, Roger Brown, who first taught me to love the eighteenth century and the historian's craft.

It is a very great pleasure to acknowledge the help and support of the many people and institutions who contributed to this project, including

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Not All Wives: Women of Colonial Philadelphia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 217

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.