Ulysses S. Grant: Politician

By William B. Hesseltine | Go to book overview

Chapter VIII The First Clash

ALREADY irate over Grant's assertions of independence, the politicians were lying in wait to discipline the new President. According to the law passed to enable the Radicals to keep an eye on Johnson, the first session of the Forty-first Congress assembled on March 4. The next day, the President sent in the names of his Cabinet. In addition to Washburne and Stewart, the President nominated Judge E. Rockwood Hoar of Massachusetts, to be Attorney-General; General Jacob D. Cox, of Ohio, for Secretary of the Interior; and J. A. J. Creswell, of Maryland, as Postmaster-General. The much-discussed Pennsylvanian turned out to be Adolph E. Borie, appointed Secretary of the Navy. No nomination was made for the War Department.

Only good Republican names appeared on this roster, yet no one of them, with the possible exception of Creswell--who had been a secessionist early in the war, and more recently a violent Radical--would have been chosen by the politicians. Stupefied by the shock, the Senate ratified the list unanimously, while throughout the country the people rejoiced that Grant had "cut himself loose from a set of party hacks" who had been dominating the government.1 "GeneralGrant will have for his chief assistants only those who are untainted with the trickery and corruption which are the bane of contemporary politics," declared the toadying press,2 and Greeley's Tribune rejoiced that "the new Cabinet means business emphatically."3

But though a few sycophants and reformers may have rejoiced in the Cabinet, the politicians of both parties were enraged. "No patriot with right intentions," declared Welles, would have selected such a Cabinet, and the Democratic World declared that Grant had made "a terrible blunder . . . in taking no one in his confidence" while making his selections.4 Especially difficult to swallow were Washburne and Borie. Washburne's consistent fight for economy in government had

____________________
1
Emory Washburne, ( Cambridge) to Washburne, March 8, 1869, and letters from R. P. Spalding, ( Washington) March 6, and Prosper M. Wetmore, ( N. Y.) March 9, Washburne MSS.
2
New York Times, March 8, 1869.
3
New York Tribune, March 6, 1869.
4
Welles, Diary, III, 544-545, N. Y. World, March 7, 1869.

-145-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ulysses S. Grant: Politician
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 484

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.