Ulysses S. Grant: Politician

By William B. Hesseltine | Go to book overview

Chapter XIV Smoke Screen

THE elections of 1870, with their disastrous effect on the Republican majorities in Senate and House, were unmistakable evidence that the country disapproved of Grant's Administration. Cox's resignation was but a straw in the gale which Grant's appointments had raised. In New York and Missouri, defections from the Administration assumed threatening proportions. Murphy in New York had been able to control the Republican machine, but had lost the support of Fenton and the reformers. The Democrats carried the State, and Greeley marshaled evidence that there were "Republicans enough in New York for one successful party but not for two." Grant, thought the editor, should not recognize any divisions in the ranks of the party, and should remove no worthy Republican from office simply because he supported Fenton.1

In Missouri, the opposition to the Administration took the form of a protest against the Radicals' Southern policy. Fundamentally, the Missouri defection was based upon a dislike for the tariff, which Eastern Republicans regarded as inviolate and Western Democrats were pledging themselves to destroy. Within the State, the weak Democratic party set up an outcry against the disabilities which a Radical Constitution had imposed on ex-Confederates. With this proscription removed, Democrats might carry Missouri and send tariff reformers to Washington. Among Missouri Republicans were many who sympathized with their Democratic neighbors on tariff reform, and many who were emotionally sympathetic with the Democratic demand for "universal amnesty and universal suffrage." Moreover, factionalism beset Missouri's erstwhile Radicals. Schurz had done nothing to endear himself to the Administration, and McDonald was expending the money he mysteriously raised for party services in an effort to defeat the Senator. Perceiving the signs, Schurz headed a schism in the party, and led his "Liberal Republican" cohorts out of McDonald's party and into cooperation with the Democrats. Democrats amended the Constitution to

____________________
1
New York Tribune, November 10, 1870.

-220-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ulysses S. Grant: Politician
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 484

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.